Bon Voyage Blue Ridge

first_imgGoodbye for now Blue Ridge. Much like the geese I’ll be heading south for the winter. After all my work is seasonal and so am I. For the months of November through February, with a quick stop back home in Iowa, I’ll be searching for the right season and best climbing spots, searching for the land of the lost cowboy hat and broken spur,  this Winter I’ll be Southwest Searching.With any farewell, there is a twinge of regret to be leaving. To be saying see ya’ to the mountains I’ve climbed and to the ones left unconquered. To leave the land that provided me a place to sleep, a land full of adventure and insight, and the land made accesible by new friends.But this arrivederci provides more then remorse, this adios is not forever, and before the trees turn green I’ll be back in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains; I’ll be ready to explore, ready for more, and with the same Adventure Thirst.Saying temporary goodbyes can be good for the soul. It can be hard to realize where you’re at when you are there. It takes a little stepping back, some outside perspective, to really understand the blessed problems you have and the reasons to go back. Saying goodbye for awhile rejuvinates the daily-life, the internal battery, and the all too elusive muscle memory routine.So excuse me as I stretch my legs and continue the search for tomorrow’s adventure and I encourage you to do the same. It is a big wide world out there with many avenues left unexplored. Goodbye (for now) Blue Ridge and stay safe this winter. Look for me galloping into town with the Spring time sun. And most importantly, go outside and play.Bradlast_img read more

CUNA subcommittees discuss regulatory burdens with CFPB, NCUA

first_img 17SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Two CUNA subcommittees met with Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) staff Friday to discuss potential overdraft rules and to remind the agency of the current regulatory burden facing credit unions.The subcommittees also met with National Credit Union Administration staff Thursday, just after the agency voted to finalize its risk-based capital rule.Regarding overdraft protection, the subcommittees discussed credit union overdraft protection, and questioned the CFPB about what it is considering for its overdraft rulemaking. The bureau discussed past and ongoing research about overdraft, and indicated that it is attempting to learn about the practices of small institutions and credit unions through data collected from service providers.“Credit unions offer overdraft products very differently from for-profit institutions. Credit unions offer overdraft services as a convenience and accommodation for their members and members appreciate these services,” said Elizabeth Eurgubian, CUNA’s deputy chief advocacy officer. “We do not support broad new regulation of overdraft services that would limit the flexibility of credit unions to structure their services appropriately, including the regulation of overdraft fees.” continue reading »last_img read more

Suffolk Police Probe 6 Armed Home Invasions in 4 Weeks

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are investigating a half dozen armed home invasions over a recent four-week span, including one last week in which a family was tied up in Bay Shore, authorities said.In the first case, a man entered a Huntington Station home on Whitson Road, flashed a gun and stole both cash and a cell phone before fleeing the scene on foot shortly before 2 p.m. Nov. 20, police said. The following day, three men entered a Brentwood home on Lorraine Street, flashed a gun, demanded money and stole a PlayStation video game console at 10 p.m. Nov. 21, police said. There were neither any arrests, injuries nor descriptions of the suspects in either case.Then at 11:09 a.m. Nov. 30, Noel Hernandez allegedly entered a Brentwood home on Gates Avenue, threatened a victim with a screwdriver and stole cash and a screwdriver before fleeing the scene on foot, police said. Hernandez pleaded not guilty to charges of burglary and robbery. He was ordered held without bail and is due back in Suffolk court on Jan. 14.Of the six, that case was the only one in which an arrest has been made. The following day, two suspects entered a North Amityville home on Nathalie Avenue, where one of the duo pistol-whipped a victim at 2:45 p.m. Dec. 1, police said. Nothing was stolen in that case and the victim refused medical attention.Two weeks later, two men entered another North Amityville home, this time on Somerset Road North, where one of the suspects flashed what appeared to be a handgun and the other brandished a stun gun before they stole money from the victims at 6:51 p.m. Dec. 16, police said.A day after that case, a 35-year-old woman was entering her Bay Shore home on Woodbine Avenue with her 20-year-old female friend when they were followed into the house by two men who were armed with a handgun at 9:30 p.m. Dec. 17, police said.The suspects tied up both women, the older woman’s 35-year-old boyfriend and her 12-year-old son with zip ties before they ransacked the home for three hours and stole cash, police said. The couple was treated for minor injuries at Southside Hospital in Bay Shore. One shot was fired inside the house, but no one was injured.The suspects fled in the female victim’s 2013 Honda westbound on Greenwood Road. Police found the vehicle on 3rd Avenue in Bay Shore at 5:20 a.m.Detectives are continuing the investigations into each case. Anyone with information on these home invasions can call in tips anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS.last_img read more

Professor establishes Armenian Scholars Program in Price School

first_imgPhoto from Price School websiteThursday marked the 26th anniversary of Armenia obtaining independence from Soviet rule, and professor Frank Zerunyan celebrated by wearing his Armenian army uniform.On all other days, Zerunyan proudly displays the gift from the defense minister of Armenia on a hanger in his office in Lewis Hall. Zerunyan is of Armenian descent, but has no familial connection to the country as it stands today.Zerunyan teaches graduate level courses in the Sol Price School of Public Policy that focus on governance, negotiation and leadership, and he is in the process of establishing the Armenian Scholars program at USC. The 10-year program is set to begin in Fall 2019, the semester the first scholar arrives.  The program’s goal is to consecutively bring five scholars from Armenia to enroll in the doctorate in public policy and management program at the Price School. Upon graduating, each student will return to Armenia to form a public policy and management department at a university. By the end of the 10th year, the department will have five employees, all graduates of the USC program. If a scholar commits to working for the department for at least five years, USC will pay for his or her education.“Every year, we will try to recruit someone with a variation of interest in public policy and management so that we don’t have duplicates,” Zerunyan said. “Even though they will all come from Price, we will make sure that they all matriculate into different disciplines.”The idea for the Armenian Scholars program was conceived about five years ago when Zerunyan began traveling to Armenia to teach. It was at Yerevan State University, the largest university in the country, where Zerunyan realized public management is only offered at the undergraduate and master’s levels in Armenia; a doctoral program in public management does not exist.After brainstorming ways to combat the issue, he asked colleagues from Yerevan State University to write him a letter about the need for a doctoral program in public management. He then presented the document, as well as his ideas for the Armenian Scholars program, to Jack H. Knott, dean of the Price School.Zerunyan said Knott supported the idea then and still supports it today.“Through establishing this Price School doctorate program, we will have the opportunity to prepare the first generation of Armenian scholars and educators in public policy and management,” Knott said in an email to the Daily Trojan. “It will help to improve Armenian governance, professional public management and democratic political development. This program will reflect USC’s moral imperative to use its expertise to make a positive global impact.” According to Zerunyan, the Los Angeles area is the largest Armenian community outside of Armenia itself, making USC the perfect place for the program. “My hope is that this becomes the hub of the caucuses in the former Soviet Republics as the premier institution for public policy and management doctorate programs,” he said.Zerunyan said he will begin recruiting scholars when he teaches in Armenia next summer, and plans to make a final decision by January 2019. In the meantime, he said he will prepare, develop and raise funds for the program. “To me, this is a mission,” Zerunyan said. “We want them to go back and provide that mission back to the country.”last_img read more

Apple Tree Productions Presents: Children of Eden

first_img The cast of Eden sings Ain’t It Good, a song that celebrates the Noah family’s endurance through forty days and forty nights of rain and flooding on the Arc. Photo credit: Carissa Pierce Fredericks, who has been working with young thespians around Thurston County since 2013, performed in the historic Capitol Theater as a child and is thrilled to be back. Photo credit: Carissa Pierce Sailor Derito plays Mother Noah in Apple Tree’s Children of Eden. Photo credit: Carissa Pierce Tad Mettler and Leo Conklin play young Cain and Able in the show, while Jeff Hines-Mohrman and Sam Van Nuys play their older and more combative incarnations. Photo credit: Carissa Pierce The Family Noah sings excitedly and naively about their journey on the Arc before it begins. Photo credit: Carissa Pierce Facebook41Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Megan Conklin for Apple Tree ProductionsThurston County theater company Apple Tree Productions opens the musical Children of Eden this weekend and its charming melodies and timeless themes are sure to delight theater goers of all ages. The play tells the Biblical stories of the Garden of Eden, Cain and Able, and Noah’s Ark through word and song and is chocked full of action, excitement and romance. Take a look at this series of rehearsal pictures from Children of Eden – we are pretty sure they will inspire you to head to the Capitol Theater in downtown Olympia this Saturday or Sunday evening to see the show.Saturday, December 30 & Sunday, December 316:00 p.m. doors/7:00 p.m. show$15 General Admission / $12 OFS Members, Students & SeniorsTickets available online or at the box office day show Jackie DeShaye’s is a commanding and emotional Eve in Apple Tree’s Children of Eden. Photo credit: Carissa Piercecenter_img Apple Tree founder and director, Heidi Fredericks, has a gift for encouraging young actors in their craft. Photo credit: Carissa Pierce The cast of Children of Eden sings together about the trials of being lost in the wilderness. Photo credit: Carissa Pierce Apple Tree Productions offers “theater intensives” such as Children of Eden quarterly, often during school breaks. The students rehearse all day for a week and perform on the weekend. Photo credit: Carissa Pierce 1 of 10 Jackie DeShaye as Eve, and Adam Zimmerman as Adam, mourn the death of their son Able, played by Sam Van Nuys. Photo credit: Carissa Piercelast_img read more

Tax planning in an unusual year — Prevented planting indemnity payments, Market Facilitation payments and cost-share payments

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management & Director, Ohio State University Income Tax SchoolsWith unprecedented amounts of prevented planting insurance claims this year in Ohio and other parts of the Midwest, many producers will be considering different tax management strategies in dealing with this unusual income stream. In a normal year, producers have flexibility in how they generate and report income. In a year such as this when they will have a large amount of income from insurance indemnity payments the flexibility is greatly reduced. In a normal year a producer may sell a part of grain produced in the year of production and store the remainder until the following year to potentially take advantage of higher prices and/or stronger basis. For example, a producer harvests 200,000 bushels of corn in 2019, sells 100,000 bushels this year and the remainder in 2020. As most producers use the cash method of accounting and file taxes as a cash based filer, the production sold in the following year is reported as income in that year and not in the year of production. This allows for flexibility when dealing with the ups and downs of farm revenue.Generally, crop insurance proceeds should be included in gross income in the year the payments are received, however Internal Revenue Code Section (IRC §) 451(f) provides a special provision that allows insurance proceeds to be deferred if they are received as a result of “destruction or damage to crops.”As prevented planting insurance proceeds qualify under this definition, they can qualify for a one year deferral for inclusion in taxable income. These proceeds can qualify if the producer meets the following criteria:Taxpayer uses the cash method of accounting.Taxpayer receives the crop insurance proceeds in the same tax year the crops are damaged.Taxpayer shows that under their normal business practice they would have included income from the damaged crops in any tax year following the year the damage occurred.The third criteria is the sometimes the problem. Most can meet the criteria, although if producers want reasonable audit protection, they should have records showing the normal practice of deferring sales of grain produced and harvested in year 1 subsequently stored and sold in the following year. To safely “show that under their normal business practice they would have included income from the damaged crops in any tax year following the year the damage occurred” the taxpayer should follow IRS Revenue Ruling 75-145 that requires that he or she would have reported more than 50% of the income from the damaged or destroyed crops in the year following the loss. A reasonable interpretation in meeting the 50% test is that a farmer may aggregate the historical sales for crops receiving insurance proceeds but tax practitioners differ on the interpretation of how this test may be met.One big problem with these crop insurance proceeds is that a producer can’t divide it between years. It is either claimed in the year the damage occurred and the crop insurance proceeds were received or it is all deferred until the following year. The election to defer recognition of crop insurance proceeds that qualify is an all or nothing election for each trade or business IRS Revenue Ruling 74-145, 1971-1.Tax planning options for producers depend a great deal on past income and future income prospects. Producers that have lower taxable income in the last 3 years (or tax brackets that weren’t completely filled) may want to consider claiming the prevented planting insurance proceeds this year and using Income Averaging to spread some of this year’s income into the prior 3 years. Producers that have had high income in the past 3 years and will experience high net income in 2019 may consider deferring these insurance proceeds to 2020 if they feel that this year may have lower farm net income. Market Facilitation PaymentsWhen the next round(s) of Market Facilitation Payments (MFPs) are issued, they will be treated the same as the previous rounds for income tax purposes. These payments must be taken as taxable income in the year they are received. As these payments are intended to replace income due to low prices stemming from trade disputes, these payments should be included in gross income in the year received. As these payments constitute earnings from the farmers’ trade or business they are subject to federal income tax and self-employment tax. Producers will almost certainly not have the option to defer these taxes until next year. Some producers waited until early 2019 to report production from 2018 and therefore will report this income from the first round of Market Facilitation Payments as taxable income in 2019.Producers will likely not have the option of delaying their reporting and subsequent MFP payments due to the fact they are contingent upon planted acreage reporting of eligible crops and not yield reporting as the first round of MFP payments were. Cost share paymentsIncreased prevented planting acres this year have many producers considering cover crops to better manage weeds and erosion and possibly qualify for a reduced MFP. There is also the possibility that producers will be eligible for cost-share payments via the Natural Resources Conservation Service for planting cover crops. Producers should be aware that these cost-share payments will be included on Form 1099-G that they will receive and the cost-share payments will need to be included as income.You are advised to consult a tax professional for clarification of these issues as they relate to your circumstances.last_img read more

Uttar Pradesh Public Service Commission announces job vacancies for various posts

first_imgThe Uttar Pradesh Public Service Commission (UPPSC) has invited applications for Chief Fire Officer, Assistant Statistical Officer, Engineers and other positions.VacanciesName of the posts:Chief Fire Officer – 11 PostsAssistant Statistical Officer – 58 PostsVetting Officer – 2 PostsSports Officer – 2 PostsDeputy Sports Officer – 10 PostsAssistant Coach – 5 PostsLecturer Physics – 1 PostResearch Officer (Statistics) – 5 PostsAssistant Statistical Officer – 92 PostsEngineers – 7 PostsProfessor Prasuti Awam Stri Rog – 1 PostProfessor Repertory – 4 PostsRegistrar – 3 PostsEligibilityAge Limit: Candidates are required to check the official notification for post-wise age limit details.Educational Qualification: Candidates are required to check the official notification for post-wise age educational qualification details.Selection Procedure: An interview would be conducted to shortlist candidates.How to applyA. Application Fee: Rs 95 for general candidate category and Rs 55 for SC/ST categoryB. Interested candidates can visit the official and apply online.C. Important Dates: Last date for applying online is October 30, 2014.last_img read more

BCCI invites applications for the post of Team Manager

first_imgAmid the ongoing confusion in the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) after the announcement of Ravi Shastri as the head coach along with Zaheer Khan and Rahul Dravid as overseas bowling and batting consultants respectively, the national board on Saturday invited applications for the Team Manager.The candidates were asked to submit their applications before July 21.”The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) would like to call upon interested candidates to apply for the position of the Team Manager for the senior India men’s cricket team,” the advertisement on the board’s website read.”The appointment of a Team Manager shall be for a minimum period of one year.”One of the main criterion the board has asked is the candidate should have played good level of cricket, preferably first class or at international level.”The candidates who have (i) successfully managed a cricket team of any of the affiliated units of BCCI or the national teams, at the first class or at the International level, or (ii) have a minimum of ten years of work experience in public/private sector, will be preferred.”The board also wanted a candidate below the age of 60 years with the ability to withstand the rigours of the international cricket schedule of the team.last_img read more

Tony Clement and the Ring of Fire

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe resources held deep beneath what is commonly known as the Ring of Fire is well known.For one, the mining industry believes northern Ontario has one of the largest deposits of chromite in the world.But getting a billion dollars worth of resources hasn’t been easy.Now the federal government is hoping to move things along.Prime Minister Stephen Harper has appointed Minister Tony Clement, president of the Treasury Board, to bring First Nations, industry and the province of Ontario together.Clement joined APTN National News in Ottawa last week.last_img read more