Minister Declares Chile Will Not Cede Territory to Bolivia

first_imgBy Dialogo December 19, 2012 Chilean Minister of Foreign Affairs Alfredo Moreno, denied that his country is planning to grant part of its sovereign territory to Bolivia, and dismissed that the Bolivian state had a different vision over the Treaty of 1904, by means of which he ceded its maritime coasts to Chile after a war conflict. “Bolivia says that Chile should grant them a sovereign portion of Chile. I do not think that way; the President (Sebastián Piñera) does not think that way, nor do the vast majority of Chileans,” Moreno said, according to local radio station Cooperativa on December 14. By the end of the XIX century, Bolivia and Chile fought the Pacific War, and then signed a peace treaty to put an end to the conflict in 1904. In this agreement, Bolivia granted to Chile the territory and maritime area that was in the Pacific Ocean, in exchange for commercial facilities in northern Chilean ports. However, Bolivia rejects the agreement and demands that Chile grant them a portion of land and sea to compensate for its lack of maritime access. President Evo Morales said he would bring the referendum to an international court, as in the case of Peru, which claimed a maritime border with Chile before the International Court of Justice at The Hague. Bolivia sent a delegation to The Hague to follow the hearings in the Peruvian maritime claim, which concluded on December 14. Regarding this issue, Minister Moreno confirmed that the cases are different, since Peru is not aware of the treaties signed in 1952 and 1954, which fixed the maritime border according to Chilean judgment, and Bolivia recognizes the validity of the Treaty of 1904 with Chile. “Bolivia agrees that the Treaty of 1904 states exactly what the Chileans claim,” Moreno declared. The Chilean Minister added that his country is willing to seek solutions “based on what was agreed over 100 years ago, which established the boundaries of Bolivia and Chile.” “This also requires political leadership in Bolivia,” Minister Moreno assured. Bolivia and Chile have no diplomatic relations since 1978.last_img read more

Eboighe gets Medical support

first_img Promoted Content14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowKendall Jenner’s Photos Have Never Looked This Good!8 Best 1980s High Tech GadgetsThese TV Characters Proved That Any 2 People Can Bury The Hatchet12 Celebrities Who Almost Ruined Their Careers With One MovieMind-Bending Technology That Was Predicted Before It Appeared10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do6 TV Shows That Got Better After A Major Character Had Left9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearCOVID-19 Pandemic Has Significantly Improved Air Quality Eboighe had been bedridden as a result of a strange ailment that had made it impossible for the ex Bendel  Insurance of Benin player to use his limbs. His plight had attracted the attention of the Minister who sent a staff of the Ministry to hand him some cash and also ascertain areas of further assistance.After due consultations, the Minister contacted the Deputy Governor who then raised a medical team to do a proper evaluation of the state of health of the ex-player.A medical team visited Eboighe at his Benin City residence on Monday for proper evaluation and will soon  commence treatment to get him back on his feet.The Minister promised to pick the medical bill of the former International .Eboighe who played alongside the likes of Bright Omokaro, Stephen Keshi, Augustine Eguavoen, Friday Elaho among others was a member of the Morroco 88 and Algiers 90 Nations cup Super Eagles team. read also:National Council on Sports agree to hold Sports FestivalThe poor welfare of ex-internationals had prompted the Ministry of Youth and Sports Development to request the Nigeria Football Federation to come up with welfare incentives for injured and sick ex-international footballers. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Advertisement Ailing  former Super Eagles defender Sunday Eboighe may soon be back on his feet following the intervention of the Minister of Youth and Sports Development Mr. Sunday Dare and Edo State Deputy Governor Comrade Philip Shuiabu to raise a team of medical experts to look into his medical condition. Loading… last_img read more

Elliott down; Connelly steps to challenge

first_imgTalk about being thrown right into the fire.With UW junior goalie Brian Elliott injuring his left leg at practice Wednesday, freshman Shane Connelly — who has yet to see action in a regular season game — has quickly become the center of attention as the No. 1-ranked Badgers host No. 19 Denver this weekend.”This would be a first,” Connelly said after practice Thursday as he was surrounded by a group of reporters. “It’s something new. I’m pretty excited.”Elliott had been nothing short of spectacular between the pipes through UW’s first 22 contests, compiling an 18-2-2 record, a 1.40 goals against average and a .946 save percentage. He was the top goalie and arguably the best player in the country this season.Now he will be forced to view the next 3-4 weeks in street clothes.The only action outside of practice Connelly has seen since joining the Badgers’ squad at the beginning of this season came against the United States Under-18 team a month ago.The Cheltenham, Penn. native made 19 saves but gave up five goals as Wisconsin picked up a 6-5 come-from-behind victory.It was not quite the debut that Connelly had hoped for, but he said getting to see some action did help his progress.”I watched the tape, went back to work with [goalie coach Bill Howard] and just got in the flow a little more,” Connelly said. “I’ve watched a lot of gamedays, but now I’ve got one under my belt. More confidence is the biggest thing.”Included in the five goals allowed were a few that slipped through his legs, which undoubtedly he would love to have back.But that performance is in the rearview mirror at this point, and Connelly will be thrust into the limelight under the grandest of circumstances.Not only will he be making his official debut for the top-ranked team in the country looking to knock off the two-time defending national champion Pioneers, he will be doing so in front of a sold-out Kohl Center.”I never thought it would be my first WCHA game, but it’s arrived,” Connelly said. “I’m more excited than nervous.”Connelly has been preparing all year and each individual weekend just in case he would be needed.”Each weekend you kind of get your mindset just in case, get ready,” Connelly said.That “just-in-case” moment happened to come Wednesday.”This is obviously one of the biggest days of my life coming up … I’m just excited and ready to go,” Connelly said.”I think I’m ready.”Knocking off the PioneersThere is no doubt that both teams will have bulls-eyes on their backs at the Kohl Center this weekend.Denver will be trying to defend its national title while the now-battered Badgers trying to hold onto their No. 1 ranking and maintain their lead in the WCHA, and this is the only time they will see each other in the regular season.”What it adds up to is another great weekend,” Eaves said. “That becomes a natural motivator.”Denver struggled a bit last weekend, splitting with St. Cloud State, but remains tied for second in the WCHA with Minnesota, eight points behind Wisconsin.Even though they will be without Elliott, the Badgers are taking this series as if it were any other.”Nothing’s going to change this weekend,” senior assistant captain Tom Gilbert said. “We’re going to come out hard, score some goals and get four points this weekend.”In league games, Denver ranks fourth on offense with 3.31 goals per game and also has the third-best defense, allowing 2.62 goals per game.They have two of the top three scorers in the league in sophomore Paul Stastny and junior Matt Carle, but senior Gabe Gauthier may be the biggest threat.”Gauthier is their biggest talent,” senior captain Adam Burish said. “We’ve got to be real aware when he’s on the ice.”Between the pipes, the Pioneers have split time between the talented duo of sophomore Peter Mannino (2.35 GAA, .917 save percentage) and junior Glenn Fisher (2.77, .901).The Badgers will probably have to knock in a few extra goals — which wasn’t a problem when they scored 12 in two games at Colorado College last week — if they hope to be successful.UW, along with boasting the toughest defense in the league — they are allowing just 1.44 goals per game — can also now lay claim to the WCHA’s best offense, as the Badgers effort last weekend propelled them to 3.94 goals per league game.Of course, without Elliott, it’s a whole new ballgame.last_img read more

BRITISH-IRISH ASSEMBLY: DUP POLITICIAN LAUNCHES SCATHING ATTACK ON WIND FARMS

first_imgA DUP politician from the North today launched a scathing attack on wind farms – saying the people of Ireland don’t want them.MLA Jim Wells was speaking at the meeting of the British-Irish Parliamentary Assembly which is in session at LYIT in Letterkenny today.A number of executives from wind farm companies from Ireland and Britain have addressed parliamentarians from Ireland, Scotland, England, Wales, the Isle of Man and Jersey. The meeting – chaired by Donegal Deputy Joe McHugh – will continue tomorrow.Having listened to the wind farm companies, Mr Wells described them as ‘monstrosities.’He said the people of Ireland, north and south, don’t want them.The Assembly member said they had destroyed the countryside in his South Down constituency. He also said the idea there was no carbon footprint from wind farms was wrong because one was produced during their manufacture.“There’s also a perception that because of opposition to wind farms in Britain, that the problem is being exported to Ireland,” said Mr Wells.The Taoiseach Enda Kenny is due to address the 46th Plenary Session of the Assembly this afternoon.There is a large Garda presence in and around Letterkenny today.Protestors are due to arrive at the LYIT at 2.30pm. BRITISH-IRISH ASSEMBLY: DUP POLITICIAN LAUNCHES SCATHING ATTACK ON WIND FARMS was last modified: March 4th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:BRITISH-IRISH ASSEMBLY: DUP POLITICIAN LAUNCHES SCATHING ATTACK ON WIND FARMSlast_img read more

Umpires Are Less Blind Than They Used To Be

Umps are getting better, and they’re also remarkably consistent. An ump who makes more accurate calls in one year will likely do the same the next; an ump who misses more calls in a given season will likely be as bad the next. Umpire accuracy is more steady than a player’s batting average or a pitcher’s ERA, and as consistent as OPS (on-base plus slugging) and wins above replacement.To see how this works, look at the performance of Lance Barksdale and Tim Welke. While they both follow the league’s general trend of increased accuracy — more about that later — they have, respectively, been one of the best and one of the worst umpires over the past seven years. The difference between Barksdale and a league average ump is about five correct calls per game; the difference between Barksdale and the league’s worst umpire is closer to 10 calls a game. On average, that’s about one judgment call per inning that a good ump is getting right and a bad ump is getting wrong. That might not sound like much, but if once every six outs a batter gets another swing after a third strike that wasn’t or a pitcher strikes a hitter out on a pitch that’s actually a ball, you can start to see the impact.Given their differences, umps develop reputations. Near the end of infielder Mark DeRosa’s 16-year career, he knew what to expect from the umpire calling balls and strikes. “You gain knowledge over the course of being in the big leagues for the course of a couple of seasons,” he said. “You understand which umpires are a little bit wider in their zone, who are a little bit more north-south, who’s going to force the pitcher to come tight.”Before games, he and his teammates would even talk about what they could expect during the game: “A comment would be passed back and forth, whether we should be pulling the trigger tonight or ‘this guy is normally a hitter’s umpire and likes to force the pitcher to come back over the plate, so let’s be a little bit more picky with what you’re going to swing at.’ ”An umpire who understands what calls he is missing is an ump who can improve. “It was amazing how my perspective of the strike zone changed when I got this technology,” Dellinger said. “I thought pitches were on the plate, until you get that data back. You see that some of those pitches were not on the plate. It wasn’t something that was done intentionally. It was just your perception of the strike zone. I was able to quickly make adjustments based on having that information, which was huge to me.”Seeing the data, however, can make fans less charitable. “They see a pitch that is out of the box, and they think, ‘Aw, he’s a bad umpire,’ ” Dellinger said. “I’m thinking, ‘You should have seen it 15 or 20 years ago.’ ”He’s right — ump accuracy has improved since 2008. But it has been on only one type of pitch: strikes.While umps call balls no differently than they did seven years ago, they’re accurately gauging strikes at much higher rates. This distinction is so large that Brian Mills, a professor of tourism, recreation and sports management at the University of Florida, cites the increasing size of the strike zone as accounting for about half of the league’s 50-point drop in OPS since 2008. In other words, steroid testing isn’t the only change responsible for MLB’s drop in offensive output. It’s also more called strikes.While the league and the umpires association have access to data showing that specific umps tend to be better at calling balls and strikes, it does not appear that they use this information to reward those who are the most accurate with choice assignments, like the All-Star Game or the postseason.2MLB declined to make specific umpires available for interviews but did let Peter Woodfork, senior vice president of baseball operations, and Randy Marsh, director of major league umpires, talk.According to Peter Woodfork, senior vice president of baseball operations, balls and strikes play a role, but don’t write Lance Barksdale’s name into your World Series scorecard just yet. “Once you meet a standard, you’re in the mix,” Woodfork said, likening the selection process to that of the NCAA tournament. Assignments are doled out using a mix of analytics and judgment: “Balls and strikes is taken into account along with field work, rules, instant replay and handling situations. Professionalism also factors into grading umpires. The plate work may carry more weight in the evaluation, but they are all important.”If plate work is important, it hasn’t shown in playoff assignments. According to numbers from BaseballSavant.com, umps who were No. 70, 71 and 76 in the accuracy rankings (out of 79) called balls and strikes in the ALCS last year, with only one of the top 10 umps receiving a league championship series or World Series spot. And this more exhaustive look at umps also finds that postseason spots do not appear to be linked to regular-season performance. “Like any other profession, you can go up and go down, but the consistency over time often helps,” Woodfork said. “We don’t ignore what you’ve done in the past, but that year carries the most weight.” If that’s true, expect our old friend Barksdale to receive a high-profile opportunity, as his 90 percent accuracy rate through July 1 is far and away the best single-season number in our data.But while decisions on postseason spots won’t come for several weeks, MLB has already had one opportunity to reward an umpire for past performance, getting to pick a home plate umpire for July’s All-Star Game. It chose Tim Welke — the same Tim Welke who has consistently had one of the league’s worst rankings since 2008. Dusty Dellinger knows how difficult it is to be an umpire. “There’s an old saying that they expect you to be perfect from day one and get better,” the former Major League Baseball official said over the phone. As the director of Minor League Baseball Umpire Development and the Minor League Baseball Umpire Training Academy, he knows how elusive perfection can be.Correctly calling 140 pitches flying 90-plus mph and breaking six inches or more is a near-impossible standard. And when mistakes are made, players and managers aren’t bashful. Jonathan Papelbon said D.J. Reyburn should “go back to Triple A” after a confrontation over balls and strikes. Joe Girardi complained about inconsistency. Larry Andersen did too after he retired, labeling the men behind the plate arrogant. You don’t have to look too hard for more examples.That’s led plenty of people to wonder when robots will come for the umps’ jobs. But lost amid those blue-sky dreams is what’s happened to the way we judge the blue behind the plate. Technology has changed how we can evaluate umps. It shows that umps are getting better, that there’s a significant gap between the best and worst, and that the best umps aren’t working the biggest games.After every game, umpires receive a report from the league office that informs them about their accuracy, their correct calls, and the ones they missed. Pitchers, hitters and fans have near-instant access to information on an umpire’s accuracy, too. The chart below shows the accuracy rates for calling balls and strikes for each ump since 2008, when MLB installed the PITCHf/x tracking system in every stadium.1The data was collected from BaseballSavant.com. Umps in the data set saw at least 3,000 pitches (called balls or strikes) in each season, with a smaller restriction (1,800 pitches) for 2015. read more