Wenger weighing up weekend selection

first_img Nacho Monreal was cup-tied in midweek and is set to come back into the defence as left-back Kieran Gibbs will be rested after completing his first 90 minutes since his recovery from a thigh problem. However, Wenger insisted team selection would always come down to individual form. He added: “They have played so many games until now. Their position is very important in the squad. “But every position is up for grabs. You have to face it like that, the last game decides the next one. “All the players are in the same position. Nobody is guaranteed places in the team. “Everybody faces the same competition and the players who (have) come in have been on the bench for a long, long time. “They all have the same problem, the job of being a top-level competitor is to deal with that.” Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger has yet to make up his mind whether to recall captain Thomas Vermaelen and goalkeeper Wojciech Szczesny at Swansea on Saturday – but said “nobody is guaranteed a place”. Szczesny was left back in London when the rest of the squad travelled out to Munich on Tuesday afternoon, with Wenger revealing the Poland international had been “mentally affected” by the number of games he played this season. Lukasz Fabianski impressed in the 2-0 win at the Allianz Arena and is hoping to retain his place. Skipper Vermaelen, meanwhile, was left on the bench as Laurent Koscielny – whose late header provided Arsenal’s second goal on Wednesday night as they went out on away goals – partnered Per Mertesacker. Wenger said: “They (Vermaelen and Szczesny) are two outstanding players who are part of our squad.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Professor establishes Armenian Scholars Program in Price School

first_imgPhoto from Price School websiteThursday marked the 26th anniversary of Armenia obtaining independence from Soviet rule, and professor Frank Zerunyan celebrated by wearing his Armenian army uniform.On all other days, Zerunyan proudly displays the gift from the defense minister of Armenia on a hanger in his office in Lewis Hall. Zerunyan is of Armenian descent, but has no familial connection to the country as it stands today.Zerunyan teaches graduate level courses in the Sol Price School of Public Policy that focus on governance, negotiation and leadership, and he is in the process of establishing the Armenian Scholars program at USC. The 10-year program is set to begin in Fall 2019, the semester the first scholar arrives.  The program’s goal is to consecutively bring five scholars from Armenia to enroll in the doctorate in public policy and management program at the Price School. Upon graduating, each student will return to Armenia to form a public policy and management department at a university. By the end of the 10th year, the department will have five employees, all graduates of the USC program. If a scholar commits to working for the department for at least five years, USC will pay for his or her education.“Every year, we will try to recruit someone with a variation of interest in public policy and management so that we don’t have duplicates,” Zerunyan said. “Even though they will all come from Price, we will make sure that they all matriculate into different disciplines.”The idea for the Armenian Scholars program was conceived about five years ago when Zerunyan began traveling to Armenia to teach. It was at Yerevan State University, the largest university in the country, where Zerunyan realized public management is only offered at the undergraduate and master’s levels in Armenia; a doctoral program in public management does not exist.After brainstorming ways to combat the issue, he asked colleagues from Yerevan State University to write him a letter about the need for a doctoral program in public management. He then presented the document, as well as his ideas for the Armenian Scholars program, to Jack H. Knott, dean of the Price School.Zerunyan said Knott supported the idea then and still supports it today.“Through establishing this Price School doctorate program, we will have the opportunity to prepare the first generation of Armenian scholars and educators in public policy and management,” Knott said in an email to the Daily Trojan. “It will help to improve Armenian governance, professional public management and democratic political development. This program will reflect USC’s moral imperative to use its expertise to make a positive global impact.” According to Zerunyan, the Los Angeles area is the largest Armenian community outside of Armenia itself, making USC the perfect place for the program. “My hope is that this becomes the hub of the caucuses in the former Soviet Republics as the premier institution for public policy and management doctorate programs,” he said.Zerunyan said he will begin recruiting scholars when he teaches in Armenia next summer, and plans to make a final decision by January 2019. In the meantime, he said he will prepare, develop and raise funds for the program. “To me, this is a mission,” Zerunyan said. “We want them to go back and provide that mission back to the country.”last_img read more

No. 17 Syracuse loses 3-point shootout with No. 1 Oregon, 81-64

first_imgOn the first possession of the second quarter, Maeva Djaldi-Tabdi collected an offensive rebound and kicked a pass out to the top of the key to Kiara Lewis for a wide-open, catch-and-shoot 3. Two more 3-pointers on SU’s next pair of possessions meant Lewis had gone on a personal 9-0 run to give the Orange a 24-15 lead, their biggest of the night. “I just took what they gave me,” Lewis, who scored a career-high 23 points, said. By the time Emily Engstler drilled a 3-pointer from the wing three minutes later, SU had attempted 20 3-pointers compared to six field goals from inside the arc. By halftime, Syracuse had gone 7-for-24 from deep and trailed No. 1 Oregon by one. SU made the game a 3-point contest, and it was working. But in the second half, the Ducks (4-0) took the 3 away from No. 17 Syracuse (3-1). By running shooters off the arc and forcing them to drive, Oregon held SU to three makes on 11 3-point shots in the second half. The Ducks, on the other end, sunk the open looks they missed in the first half. Oregon outscored Syracuse 31-16 in the third quarter, sinking 54% of its second-half 3-pointers on its way to a 81-64 win. “We kind of just played in our flow and kind of forgot about all our shots we had missed earlier,” Oregon senior Sabrina Ionescu said. “I think that really helped us and that third quarter was probably the best that we’ve played offensively in a really long time.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse head coach Quentin Hillsman tells just about everyone on his team to shoot 3-pointers when they’re open. It’s part of his coaching philosophy. But it was clear SU was taking that message to an extreme in the first quarter, when Djaldi-Tabdi shot three 3-pointers in the first quarter alone. Though the backup center has been working to expand her range, Djaldi-Tabdi entered Sunday’s contest with two prior attempts this year. The Orange shot 12 triples in both the first and second quarters, making seven of them. The combination of a high volume of 3s and a defense that held Ionescu scoreless for nearly 15 minutes led fans in the Carrier Dome to give SU a standing ovation as the team ran into the locker room for halftime. To separate from the Orange after halftime, the Ducks relied on their own 3-point barrage. Oregon head coach Kelly Graves called the Ducks’ first-half offense “stagnant,” but Ionescu opened the floor in the second half by attracting SU defenders into the paint like a magnet and dishing to open shooters. Two of the reigning Wooden Award winner’s six assists led to Oregon 3s. Erin Boley (19 points, 5-for-9 from 3) and Satou Sabally (23 points, 4-for-10 from 3) often finished possessions that started with Ionescu, who averages a triple double.“We were just helping too much,” Hillsman said. “We really talked about staying home on penetration. And I give (Ionescu) credit. She did a really good job attacking the paint, drawing our defenders, sucking them in a little bit and making good passes.”  When SU locked down Oregon’s shooters, Ionescu had more space to score inside. Thirty seconds into the third quarter, Ionescu dribbled into Syracuse’s zone and looked to kick out to a shooter, but the Orange zone extended out. So instead, Ionescu, who finished with 19 points, lofted in a floater. To end the third quarter, Sabally sunk a 3-pointer from the right corner while getting fouled. Though the Ducks junior missed her free throw, she followed the shot and collected it, eventually finding Ionescu for a buzzer-beating 3. Six points, all in one possession, gave the Ducks a 16-point lead heading into the fourth quarter.Ionescu said SU didn’t play Oregon any differently in the second half. Instead, the Ducks simply took their offense “to another level.” In total, Oregon went 7-for-13 from 3 in the second half, while SU’s offense sputtered out. Syracuse’s 35 attempts were slightly more than its season average of 29.6, but the Orange shot a worse percentage (28.6%) than their usual 32.5%. At the end of one possession, Lewis had to force a contested pull-up 3, which she airballed. In transition, Digna Strautmane’s catch-and-shoot triple was too strong. With the game decided late in the fourth, Djaldi-Tabdi jab-stepped then shot a 3-pointer from the corner, which clanked off the iron. In the fourth quarter, SU never got within single digits. The Ducks solved the Orange’s 3-point attack and found an effective recipe for SU’s 2-3 zone with deep-balls of their own. That combination pushed SU to 0-18 all-time versus No. 1-ranked opponents and led Hillsman to open his press conference with a statement about how disappointed he was in his team’s third quarter and how moral victories don’t exist.  “There’s some good things offensively in that first half,” Hillsman said. “But at the end of the day, it just wasn’t enough in the second half to win the game.”  Comments Published on November 24, 2019 at 8:44 pm Contact Danny: dremerma@syr.edu | @DannyEmerman Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more