South African rhinos off to Zambia

first_img28 May 2008Rhino conservation in Southern Africa has been given a major boost following a relocation agreement between South Africa, Namibia and Zambia, with five black rhinos being transported from South Africa to Zambia this week.“This translocation shows that we, as South African National Parks (SANParks), are definitely committed to regional conservation and are certainly not xenophobic when it comes to creating more habitat for Africa’s endangered species,” said the Kruger National Park executive director Bandile Mkhize.The operation is as a result of an agreement reached last year between Zambian Wildlife Authority (ZAWA), the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism, SANParks and Eastern Cape Parks, and will see the distribution of the various black rhino subspecies (including Diceros bicornis bicornis and Diceros bicornis minor) increased across the southern African region.In exchange for 12 examples of the rare desert or southwestern black rhino subspecies (Diceros bicornis bicornis) from Namibia – which went to SANParks and Eastern Cape Parks-administered parks and reserves – five examples of black rhino (Diceros bicornis minor) are on their way to Zambia today.A further five rhinos from the Eastern Cape Parks will follow these rhinos next year and the remaining two black rhinos have been exchanged for four white rhinos and these will be delivered to Zambia later this year.Namibia will receive plains game from Zambia in exchange for the 12 rhino that were delivered to South Africa last year.Four of the animals that were translocated today come from Kruger and the remaining rhino from Marakele National Park. The rhinos, two bulls and three cows, will be settled in North Luangwa National Park in Zambia, with the support from the Frankfurt Zoological Society.With all its game transfer operations, SANParks subscribes to the strict guidelines laid down by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) for these operations.When this current translocation project is concluded, it will mean that 13 of the 20 rhino introduced to North Luangwa National Park from South Africa in Zambia were supplied by SANParks.“In recent times, we have transferred various species of animals to both the Limpopo National Park and the Gorongoza National Park in Mozambique,” Mkhize said. “This shows that the Kruger National Park is definitely committed to conservation projects in our entire region and not just South Africa.”SAinfo reporter Would you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Changes made to rules on applying fertilizer

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Take a whole class or just take the test, which is better? Farmers will get to decide.Those who apply fertilizer on 50 or more acres now have the option to take an exam or attend a three-hour course to get the required certification aimed at protecting water quality.The exam is a new option the Ohio Department of Agriculture will offer to make it easier for farmers to get certified and yet ensure that those who are applying fertilizer know the safest measures. The exam option was one of the rule changes on fertilizer certification that went into effect Oct. 1.The other changes include the following:Those renewing their fertilizer certificate, which must be done every three years, must either pass a fertilizer exam or take a one-hour class. Previously, the recertification class was two hours.Two new items were added to the required records that certified fertilizer applicators must keep: Now they must record the number of acres where they applied fertilizer and the total amount of fertilizer applied.Only one person at a farm or business needs to be certified to apply fertilizer. A family member or employee of the certificate holder can apply fertilizer under their direct supervision, meaning the certificate holder has instructed that person where, when and how to apply fertilizer, and is no farther than 25 miles away or within two hours travel of the applicator working under their direct supervision. The rule change clarified that provision.Certificate holders who do not also hold a license to apply pesticide will see their fertilizer certificate period change to April 1 to March 31. Previously, it was June 1 to May 31. The new cycle is aimed at ensuring that certifications will generally be in place prior to the planting season.A grace period of 180 days is offered to certificate holders who do not send in their application and payment prior to the date their certificate expires. However, in renewing their certificate, the applicant has to have completed the required training or test before March 31.Since Sept. 30, growers who apply fertilizer to more than 50 acres have been required to be certified, a measure aimed at keeping nutrients from farm fields from contributing to algal blooms in Lake Erie and other bodies of water. Phosphorus and nitrogen in fertilizer can trigger the growth of algal blooms. Those blooms produce toxins in the water, making it unsafe to swim in or drink. And as the blooms decompose, they take oxygen from the water, depleting the supply available for other aquatic life. The extent of 2017 algal blooms in Lake Erie was the fourth most severe in recent history, according to a November report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.All the recent changes are aimed at making the certification process less burdensome on farmers, said Peggy Hall, agricultural and resource law field specialist for Ohio State University Extension.OSU Extension provides training for applying fertilizer, focusing on teaching how to apply fertilizer at the correct rate, time and location in the field, to keep nutrients in the field and available to crops while increasing stewardship of nearby and downstream water resources.“The goal of the entire program is that we constantly educate ourselves about how we are applying these fertilizers and make sure we understand the science behind it,” Hall said.“Hopefully more education, more understanding and continued research will help with the runoff issue.”Across Ohio, an estimated 3,700 private fertilizer applicators have certificates expiring in March 2018, according to records from the Ohio Department of Agriculture.OSU Extension will begin offering recertification programs in nearly every county this fall and winter, said Mary Ann Rose, program director for OSU Extension’s Pesticide Safety Education Program.“Most of the fertilizer recertification programs will be offered in combination with pesticide recertification meetings; farmers will have the option to attend either or both,” Rose said.For more information, visit agri.ohio.gov/apps/odaprs/pestfert-PRS-index.aspx and nutrienteducation.osu.edulast_img read more

9 injured in Vadodara riot

first_imgFour police personnel and five civilians were injured, and vehicles and one shop were torched in communal riots that erupted following an incident where stones were thrown at a Ganesh idol procession in the communally-sensitive Mandavi area of Vadodara on Thursday at around midnight.During the procession in the area, suddenly a few stones were pelted, and simultaneously electricity went off in the locality. This led to a commotion, with mobs belonging to different communities hurling stones, and starting fires. “Around eight or nine vehicles were torched and one shop was burnt down,” a Vadodara police official said. “Police and fire brigade teams were rushed to the spot to control the situation that lasted more than 90 minutes.” The police lobbed more than 25 rounds of tear gas shells to disperse rioting mobs from both sides.Following the incident, there was heavy police deployment to restore normalcy and ensure that the situation did not escalate.“We have lodged an FIR in which 25 people have been named, including tow or three habitual offenders,” the police official said. “Arrests will be made very soon.” The police are also investigating the possibility of a conspiracy by some antisocial elements to provoke riots ahead of major religious festivals and holidays like Janmashthami, Independence Day, Navratra and Diwali.last_img read more

Uttar Pradesh Public Service Commission announces job vacancies for various posts

first_imgThe Uttar Pradesh Public Service Commission (UPPSC) has invited applications for Chief Fire Officer, Assistant Statistical Officer, Engineers and other positions.VacanciesName of the posts:Chief Fire Officer – 11 PostsAssistant Statistical Officer – 58 PostsVetting Officer – 2 PostsSports Officer – 2 PostsDeputy Sports Officer – 10 PostsAssistant Coach – 5 PostsLecturer Physics – 1 PostResearch Officer (Statistics) – 5 PostsAssistant Statistical Officer – 92 PostsEngineers – 7 PostsProfessor Prasuti Awam Stri Rog – 1 PostProfessor Repertory – 4 PostsRegistrar – 3 PostsEligibilityAge Limit: Candidates are required to check the official notification for post-wise age limit details.Educational Qualification: Candidates are required to check the official notification for post-wise age educational qualification details.Selection Procedure: An interview would be conducted to shortlist candidates.How to applyA. Application Fee: Rs 95 for general candidate category and Rs 55 for SC/ST categoryB. Interested candidates can visit the official and apply online.C. Important Dates: Last date for applying online is October 30, 2014.last_img read more