Wenger weighing up weekend selection

first_img Nacho Monreal was cup-tied in midweek and is set to come back into the defence as left-back Kieran Gibbs will be rested after completing his first 90 minutes since his recovery from a thigh problem. However, Wenger insisted team selection would always come down to individual form. He added: “They have played so many games until now. Their position is very important in the squad. “But every position is up for grabs. You have to face it like that, the last game decides the next one. “All the players are in the same position. Nobody is guaranteed places in the team. “Everybody faces the same competition and the players who (have) come in have been on the bench for a long, long time. “They all have the same problem, the job of being a top-level competitor is to deal with that.” Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger has yet to make up his mind whether to recall captain Thomas Vermaelen and goalkeeper Wojciech Szczesny at Swansea on Saturday – but said “nobody is guaranteed a place”. Szczesny was left back in London when the rest of the squad travelled out to Munich on Tuesday afternoon, with Wenger revealing the Poland international had been “mentally affected” by the number of games he played this season. Lukasz Fabianski impressed in the 2-0 win at the Allianz Arena and is hoping to retain his place. Skipper Vermaelen, meanwhile, was left on the bench as Laurent Koscielny – whose late header provided Arsenal’s second goal on Wednesday night as they went out on away goals – partnered Per Mertesacker. Wenger said: “They (Vermaelen and Szczesny) are two outstanding players who are part of our squad.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Professor establishes Armenian Scholars Program in Price School

first_imgPhoto from Price School websiteThursday marked the 26th anniversary of Armenia obtaining independence from Soviet rule, and professor Frank Zerunyan celebrated by wearing his Armenian army uniform.On all other days, Zerunyan proudly displays the gift from the defense minister of Armenia on a hanger in his office in Lewis Hall. Zerunyan is of Armenian descent, but has no familial connection to the country as it stands today.Zerunyan teaches graduate level courses in the Sol Price School of Public Policy that focus on governance, negotiation and leadership, and he is in the process of establishing the Armenian Scholars program at USC. The 10-year program is set to begin in Fall 2019, the semester the first scholar arrives.  The program’s goal is to consecutively bring five scholars from Armenia to enroll in the doctorate in public policy and management program at the Price School. Upon graduating, each student will return to Armenia to form a public policy and management department at a university. By the end of the 10th year, the department will have five employees, all graduates of the USC program. If a scholar commits to working for the department for at least five years, USC will pay for his or her education.“Every year, we will try to recruit someone with a variation of interest in public policy and management so that we don’t have duplicates,” Zerunyan said. “Even though they will all come from Price, we will make sure that they all matriculate into different disciplines.”The idea for the Armenian Scholars program was conceived about five years ago when Zerunyan began traveling to Armenia to teach. It was at Yerevan State University, the largest university in the country, where Zerunyan realized public management is only offered at the undergraduate and master’s levels in Armenia; a doctoral program in public management does not exist.After brainstorming ways to combat the issue, he asked colleagues from Yerevan State University to write him a letter about the need for a doctoral program in public management. He then presented the document, as well as his ideas for the Armenian Scholars program, to Jack H. Knott, dean of the Price School.Zerunyan said Knott supported the idea then and still supports it today.“Through establishing this Price School doctorate program, we will have the opportunity to prepare the first generation of Armenian scholars and educators in public policy and management,” Knott said in an email to the Daily Trojan. “It will help to improve Armenian governance, professional public management and democratic political development. This program will reflect USC’s moral imperative to use its expertise to make a positive global impact.” According to Zerunyan, the Los Angeles area is the largest Armenian community outside of Armenia itself, making USC the perfect place for the program. “My hope is that this becomes the hub of the caucuses in the former Soviet Republics as the premier institution for public policy and management doctorate programs,” he said.Zerunyan said he will begin recruiting scholars when he teaches in Armenia next summer, and plans to make a final decision by January 2019. In the meantime, he said he will prepare, develop and raise funds for the program. “To me, this is a mission,” Zerunyan said. “We want them to go back and provide that mission back to the country.”last_img read more

ALL LOVE: After being written out of history, Syracuse 8’s forgiveness defines them

first_imgFifty years ago, nine SU football players boycotted spring practices because their demands for equitable treatment weren’t being met by the athletic department and head coach Ben Schwartzwalder. This the final installment of a three-part series tells the stories of the following scholar athletes who risked their futures for what was right: Dana Harrell, John Lobon, Richard Bulls, Duane Walker, John Godbolt, Ron Womack, Clarence McGill, Greg Allen and Alif Muhammad.Dana Harrell’s voice cracked as he addressed a rise of hatred in his alma mater’s community. At that point, Syracuse had been hit with six reported hate incidents in nine days. Seven more were reported in the next five days, including five more that evening, on Nov. 16.Students have protested Syracuse University’s response to what grew to be at least 32 hate incidents on and around campus. Harrell, though, was “proud” of SU for wrestling with the issue of racism.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Syracuse University does not condone racism,” Harrell said. “They do not condone it. They do not ignore racism.”Fifty years ago, it was Harrell who was provoked by his white teammates wielding a garden hose in a racist altercation, who had to change his natural position because quarterback was deemed a “thinking position,” who filed multiple complaints against head coach Ben Schwartzwalder to the Onondaga County Human Rights Commission.What hurt possibly even more than any injustice the Syracuse 8 collectively experienced was the feeling of being “written out of history” for more than three decades, they said. It took 35 years for the university “to hear our side of the story,” Alif Muhammad said.Harrell sees SU as a microcosm of the United States; its problems weren’t — and aren’t — unique. For everything Syracuse took from Harrell in 1970, he believes it gave him just as much: Two degrees, a wife and unbreakable bonds with the teammates he boycotted alongside.Though SU did not properly recognize the Syracuse 8 until 2006, Harrell and the other members “bleed orange” as much as any alumni. Many of them wear Syracuse gear and root for the Orange, send their children or grandchildren to SU and are still involved with the university.“It is a contradiction,” said Clarence McGill, who for years planned on never returning to campus. “But what happened here was a reality that all of us wouldn’t have been successful without that scholarship that was given to us by Ben Schwartzwalder.”,In 2005, at the triennial Coming Back Together reunion for Black and Latino alumni, some Syracuse 8 members led a workshop and retold their story. In attendance was Hall of Famer and former Syracuse football star Art Monk, who graduated in 1980. He’d never heard of the Syracuse 8.“So, when we told the story then, and hearing Art say that he didn’t know that happened here, that tells you exactly what occurred,” John Lobon said. “Nobody knew what happened because that’s how far it got buried.”The reunion was the first step in uncovering their previously hidden history. Nancy Cantor, then the university’s chancellor, attended the reunion that year and had previously read about the Syracuse 8. She said then that SU should find a way to apologize.One year later, it did. Every member of the Syracuse 8, except John Godbolt, walked onto the Carrier Dome turf at halftime of a late October game and received their letterman jacket for the first time. Cantor presented them a formal apology and the Chancellor’s Medal — the university’s highest honor. Jim Brown spoke, calling it “one of the greatest nights I have been involved in.”“It was a beautiful experience,” Ron Womack said. “I will never forget that. It helped mend some of the pain. It almost was like we felt validated, that we did belong to Syracuse … We went from troublemakers to heroes.”The university’s apology healed the scars left by the “hurtful chapter” of their boycott and SU’s subsequent neglect, Womack said. To this day, Womack wears his graduation ring, which has a picture of a football player on one side and his major, education, on the other. He shows it off to his students in Minnesota while passing on the lessons of the 1970 boycott.So, when we told the story then, and hearing Art say that he didn’t know that happened here, that tells you exactly what occurred. Nobody knew what happened because that’s how far it got buried.John Lobon, Syracuse 8 member`Since 2006, the Syracuse 8 has been chronicled in David Marc’s book “Leveling the Playing Field: The Story of the Syracuse 8,” published by Syracuse University Press, in SU’s 150th anniversary book “Forever Orange” and in a Carrier Dome display.The Syracuse 8 view their boycott as a renaissance, a return to SU’s founders’ mission of inclusion and opportunity for all, and they’re still trying to make SU better. In 2011, the Syracuse 8 started and endowed a scholarship fund for first-year Black or Latino students who’ve exhibited leadership skills and participated in community service during high school.They consider their 1970 boycott a “catalyst” for social justice initiatives and increased diversity in the student body, administration and faculty, Greg Allen said. In fall 2020, they’ll be honored once again for the 50th anniversary at the 13th Coming Back Together. As of now, the reunion is still on despite the spread of COVID-19, and the Syracuse 8 will host a panel to retell their story.,“Man, I love Syracuse,” Muhammad said. “The boycott was something we felt we had to do what was right to try to make things better. But we love Syracuse.”Eight of the nine boycotters graduated from SU, and four went on to earn master’s degrees. Allen serves on the Board of Visitors of Syracuse’s School of Education and wants his granddaughter to attend SU — as does Lobon. Womack completed the coursework for a Syracuse Ph.D. but never finished his dissertation, and Harrell went to SU’s law school.As Harrell’s children grew up, they’d get irritated with him because he’d bring them to Syracuse’s campus so frequently — you can only see Marshall Street and the Carrier Dome so many times. Even before Harrell fielded questions about his time at Syracuse, he strategically asked when this series would run, fearing a story might distract the team from spring practice or the upcoming season.“I am so committed to Syracuse. I just want to make sure everything’s positive for this team,” he said on Aug. 14.They love a program that, for decades, wanted nothing to do with them. They give back to the school that stole their opportunities, college experiences and freedom. They became scholars when institutional racism took away their athletic careers.For as much of their story is one of sacrifice, it’s also one of forgiveness.In memory of Duane Walker (1949-2010), John Godbolt (1949-2012), and Richard Bulls (1951-2010).Cover photo illustration by Talia Trackim | Presentation DirectorPhotos courtesy of Syracuse 8 Collection, Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries Published on April 26, 2020 at 9:06 pm Contact Danny: dremerma@syr.edu | @DannyEmerman,Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment. Commentslast_img