Cricket News One has to be a match-winner for the country: Lasith Malinga after ODI retirement

first_img New Delhi: The first ODI between Sri Lanka and Bangladesh at the R Premadasa stadium on Friday after the end of their poor ICC Cricket World Cup 2019 campaigns had a huge significance for the hosts. Lasith Malinga, the bowling spearhead who made a name for himself with his slinging action, brilliant death overs bowling and ability to take hat-tricks at will, was playing his last ODI. Sri Lanka was boosted by a brilliant 111 from Kusal Perera as they reached 314/8. In response, the Sri Lankan crowds witnessed a Malinga special as he sent back Tamim Iqbal and Soumya Sarkar. With Bangladesh reeling, the stage was set for Malinga to bow out with the ultimate farewell. Bowling his final over, Malinga got the wicket of Mustafizur Rahman with a full ball for 18 as Bangladesh lost by 91 runs. Malinga ended with figures of 9.4-2-38-3 and ended with 338 wickets, the ninth-best among bowlers in ODIs going past Anil Kumble’s mark. Speaking after the end of the match, Malinga said it was the right time to retire from ODIs and urged future players to be match-winners for the country. “I have been playing for the last 15 years for Sri Lanka and this is the right time to move on. My time is over and I have to go. Winning is very important for me; We are a young team. I tried my best throughout my career. Some of the young bowlers in the country have a good ability, so they need to try and produce match-winning spells. You have to be a match-winner for your team, that’s my advice,” Malinga said.Also Read | Lasith Malinga asks BIG question to himself ahead of World Cup 2019Before Malinga came on to bowl, he was given a guard of honour by both Sri Lanka and Bangladesh players and he bid an emotional goodbye to all the fans at the Premadasa. In the post-match press conference, Malinga revealed his mode of operation that had yielded him so much success in the last 15 years. ” I only targeted to ball in fuller length. That delivery gives you 3 options to get a batsman out. Either bowled, lbw or snick. Short or back of length delivery only gives an edge. Why should I try otherwise when I can get success in one delivery?,” Malinga said.Also Read | Lasith Malinga aces the art of redemption after Mumbai Indians’ one-run win in IPL 2019 finalMalinga has left a big impression in world cricket during his 15 years. His ability to nail the yorkers at will set the template for death-overs bowling. His slingy action made him unique. He created history by becoming the first bowler to take four wickets in four balls during the World Cup encounter against South Africa in Guyana during the 2007 World Cup edition. Malinga has also taken three hat-tricks in ODIs which is the most by any bowler. In the Indian Premier League, Malinga is the leading wicket-taker and played a major part in Mumbai Indians’ four IPL title triumphs, including the last one against Chennai Super Kings in Hyderabad which they won by one run when he trapped Shardul Thakur LBW with two runs needed off the last ball. Lasith Malinga is the leading wicket-taker in ODIs for Sri Lanka.Malinga has the ninth-highest wickets in ODIs with 338 wickets.Malinga is the only bowler to take four wickets in four balls. highlightscenter_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

Retirement marks end of era, poses significant challenges for successor

first_imgMany with their ear to the USC administration have been speculating for a few years now that President Steven B. Sample would be stepping down, but Monday’s announcement that he will be retiring in August was a bombshell nonetheless.Sample’s retirement will mark the end of an era in which USC has evolved into a leading research university, and raises serious questions about the university’s future — chief among them whether Sample’s successor can maintain the level of success he established in his time as president.Words of wisdom · President Steven B. Sample has taught a highly selective leadership course with management expert Warren Bemis. – Photo courtesy of USCOver the last two decades, Sample has had awide-ranging effect on the university. He has catapulted its academic standards, expanded its outreach into the community and made it a destination for students in dozens of states and dozens of countries.And Sample’s prolific fundraising efforts have enabled the significant capital improvements that give USC’s campus a vastly different face from that of 20 years ago.The impact of many of Sample’s accomplishments may not be clear for years. But after nearly two decades, his influence is felt in nearly every aspect of university life, and his retirement will leave a gaping hole in the president’s office.Sample’s announcement was hardly shocking. His Parkinson’s disease has grown worse in recent years; at one event in Washington, DC last spring, the president’s hand shook violently at times, although his voice remained sturdy during a speech to alumni. The university also announced that Sample would not be teaching his popular leadership class this year, claiming it was retooling the curriculum.Sample said the disease was not a major factor in his decision to step down from his post, according to the Los Angeles Times. Instead, he said, he wanted to step down while he was ahead.Whatever the reason, replacing a president like Sample will be no small task for the university. The Board of Trustees will likely approach leading university figures across the country and even look internationally in its effort to find a successor by May.But there are signs that USC may be looking within its own ranks. Although it is uncommon for major schools to promote a president from within, recent signs have pointed to Executive Vice President and Provost C.L. Max Nikias as a likely option.Earlier this year, the university bumped Nikias’ title from provost to executive vice president. Board of Trustees Chairman Edward P. Roski Jr. also confirmed to the Los Angeles Times that Nikias was a contender for the position.Either way, the next president will face a number of challenges in continuing the streak of success Sample established.Sample’s successor will take over at a time when the university’s finances have taken a hit. The school is still in a hiring freeze, and its endowment has lost about $1.2 billion over the last year. The financial challenges have also affected the school’s ability to offer financial aid and its ability to expand.If the USC of today looks fundamentally different than the one Sample inherited in 1991, then his successor will be facing a school that hardly resembles the USC of just five years ago.Perhaps most significantly, the next president will be taking over at a key moment in the development of the university’s Master Plan, a framework for expanding the University Park Campus over the next few decades.The proposed changes to student housing around campus, including creating 7,600 beds in the North University Park, could completely alter the look and feel of USC in the coming years and have a substantial impact on those that live in the neighborhood.Sample made cooperation with the community a key aspect of his tenure, and his successor will have to grapple with the task of balancing the school’s physical growth and the changing nature of the Figueroa Corridor with the increasingly tenuous relationship with its neighbors.As the board begins the search for a successor who can handle the complex task of managing a university with USC’s size, many are hoping Sample will continue to be a presence at the university and plan to use the rest of the year to bid farewell to the man who brought USC into the 21st century.last_img read more