Aziz Damani, Challengers victorious in Cricket league

first_imgRajesh Nair’s premier knocked an unbeaten 140 to help his side chase down Strikers .Premier has only managed one win this season for the record against the slayers strikers.Strikers was able to post 317 thanks largely to Rogers Olipa (61) and Derrick Bakunzi (63) who dug them out of a pit at 90/6. The pair had a partnership of more than 100 runs and a late cameo from Richard Agamire (27) took the score past the 300 mark.With the quality of bowlers in the Strikers attack, Premier needed something special to overhaul the total. Rajesh Nair seized the moment by taking on the Strikers attack with an array of beautiful shots. His 360 knock was supported by his captain Ratesh Nair (30) who was with him till the end.This was Premier’s first win of the season and Strikers will have to take the loss as a chance missed to gained some upward movement in a table that is becoming very tight.Aziz Damani the defending champions are closing in on their second title in a row after seeing off KICC at the lakeside oval in Entebbe.Riazat Shah the national team all rounder(100) was the hero for Damani scoring a big century with support from Saud Islam (56).KICC hustled to overhaul the richly assembled Damani side but national team opening bowler Bilal Hassan (5/35) had other ideas picking a fiver giving the defending champions an 86 run win.Meanwhile, Challengers ended Ceylon Lions winning streak with a 32 run victory at the Kyambago Grounds.Aneef Sha (100) scored his first century in local cricket with forgotten man Arthur Kyobe (70) backing him up with a half century.Simon Ssesazi (51) continued his impressive display with the bat for Ceylon Lions but his half century was not enough to drag his side over the line as they were all out with 32 runs required.Lugogo OvalStrikers CC 317/9 Derrick Bakunzi 63(66), Rogers Olipa 61(48) in 50 overs lost to Premier CC 321/6 Rajesh Nair 140(101) n.o, Ronald Opio 39(52) in 48.1 overs by 4 wicketsToss won by Premier who opted to fieldMan of match: Rajesh Nair 140(101) n.oKyambogo OvalChallengers CC 302/7 Aneef Mohamed 100(92), Arthur Kyobe 70(85) in 50 overs beat Ceylon Lions 270/10 Arnold Otwani 89(91), Simon Ssesazi 51(32), Narinder Singh 47(50) in 46.1 overs by 32 runsToss won by Ceylon who opted to fieldMan of match: Aneef Mohamed 100(92), 2/32 in 10 oversEntebbe OvalAziz Damani 278/8 Riazat Shah 108(105), Saudi Islam 58(56) in 50 Overs beat KICC 192/10 Pankal Shatpute 80(74) in 42.3 overs by 86 runsToss won by Damani who opted to batMan of match: Riazat Shah 108(105), 2/18 in 5 oversComments Tags: National cricket leaguelast_img read more

Evolutionary Predictions Fail Observational Tests

first_imgLately, some expectations by evolutionists have not been fulfilled.  Here are several recent examples of evolutionary upsets:Dinobird genes cook up scrambled eggs:  Scientists expected that the dinosaurs presumed ancestral to birds would show a decreasing genome size.  The thinking was that the cost of maintaining a large genome takes its toll on flight.  In Nature,1 however, a team found that smaller genomes evolved 230 million years ago, long before the early bird caught a worm.  Not only that, the non-avian dinosaur line (ornithischia) had sleeker genomes than the avian dinosaur line (saurischia).  Genome size was not measured directly, but inferred from a relationship between cell size and genome size.  This means that evolutionists cannot presume that genome size has anything to do with phylogeny.    Carl Zimmer in Science1a commented on this paper and on the question about genome size in general, but did not come up with any explanation for how natural selection would favor large or small genomes.  See also the write-up in Live Science which repeats the assumption that dinosaurs had feathers (but compare counterarguments from CMI). Dog beats ape:  Chimpanzees have a hard time drawing inferences about one another’s mental states by their motions.  One can point to hidden food, for instance, and the other will not get the message.  Dogs actually are much better at this, according to an article on EurekAlert.  Since dogs are supposedly farther down the evolutionary tree from humans, though, evolutionists attribute the dog’s better score to domestication: “What accounts for this piece of convergent evolution between humans and domestic dogs is nothing other than the process of domestication – the breeding of dogs to tolerate, rather than fear, human company.”  But would this mean that breeding chimps to tolerate, rather than fear, human company would produce a similar ability?  They didn’t say.Parroting humans:  Ryan Jaroncyk on Creation Ministries Intl reported about N’kisi, the wonder bird.  This parrot can speak meaningful English sentences and has a vocabulary of 950 words.  His report, based on an article in the latest BBC Wildlife Magazine, implies that “birds possess a far greater linguistic capacity than chimpanzees.”  This “defies evolutionary predictions,” he said.  He devises a thought experiment: “What if chimpanzees possessed a vocabulary of 950 words, used words in context, and formulated simple sentences like N’kisi the parrot?”  The result would be predictable: “The scientific community and popular media would be in an evolutionary frenzy.”Waspish behavior:  Time to rewrite the evolutionary history of wasps, reported a press release from Univ. of Illinois.  It’s all wrong.  “Scientists at the University of Illinois have conducted a genetic analysis of vespid wasps that revises the vespid family tree and challenges long-held views about how the wasps’ social behaviors evolved,” it states (vespids include yellowjackets, paper wasps and about 5,000 species).  “In the study, published in the Feb. 21 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers found genetic evidence that eusociality (the reproductive specialization seen in some insects and other animals) evolved independently in two groups of vespid wasps.”  The article did not speculate on how difficult it was for this ability to arise by evolution, except to say that “ The evolution of eusociality in wasps has long been a source of debate.”  The take-home lesson is that assuming simple evolutionary lineages can get you stung: “These findings contradict an earlier model of vespid wasp evolution, which placed the groups together in a single lineage with a common ancestor.”    So does this cast doubt on the validity of evolutionary speculation?  Not in the slightest.  Evolutionism is actually strengthened by the finding that data contradict the prediction:“The fact that eusociality evolved independently in two groups of vespid wasps also sheds light on the complexity of evolutionary processes, [Sydney] Cameron said.    “Scientists attempt to make generalizations and simplify the world.  But the world isn’t always simple and evolution isn’t simple.  This finding points to the complexity of life.”Winged migration:  Is there a simple evolutionary tree for bird migration?  Not here, either.  A press release in EurekAlert from studies at the University of Arizona said, “A universal assumption about bird migration has been that short-distance migration is an evolutionary stepping stone to long-distance migration.  The team’s work contradicts that idea by showing that short-distance migrants are inherently different from their globe-trotting cousins.”  Seasonal food availability, not evolution, is apparently the determining factor.  “One textbook explanation suggests either eating fruit or living in non-forested environments were the precursors needed to evolve migratory behavior.” True or false?  “Not so,” is the new correct answer.  The work is published in the March 2007 issue of American Naturalist.Scrub that:  Some birds plan ahead.  The scrub jay makes a list of things to do today, apparently.  This behavior was described in Nature,2 where the authors began, “Knowledge of and planning for the future is a complex skill that is considered by many to be uniquely human…. We show that the jays make provision for a future need, both by preferentially caching food in a place in which they have learned that they will be hungry the following morning and by differentially storing a particular food in a place in which that type of food will not be available the next morning.”  This is a longer time period than similar behavior observed over “very short time scales” in rats and pigeons.  Even crows and apes don’t show this kind of foresight.  “The results described here suggest that the jays can spontaneously plan for tomorrow without reference to their current motivational state, thereby challenging the idea that this is a uniquely human ability.”  Sara Shettleworth, in the same issue of Nature, called this “food for thought.”  Although we cannot mind-meld with a bird brain, it almost seems that these raucous garden birds are able to imagine time-travel into the future to foresee what they will need. Millipedes and biologists in the dark:  Northern Arizona University reported two identical-looking cave millipedes that cannot be related.  “We knew the millipedes likely represented two distinct species because the two populations were separated by the Grand Canyon,” said co-discoverer J. Judson Wynne.  “The fact these two species belong to an entirely new genus was a great surprise to us.”  He called them “living fossils.”Neanderthal verdict:  The idea of a simple replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans, a “a topic of lively debate in human evolution,” will have to be abandoned, apparently.  PNAS3 provided confirmation that the cave layers where bones of both groups have been found do overlap and interstratify with one another.  They based this on radiocarbon, artifacts and stratigraphy.  Unless “native Neanderthal populations effectively self-destructed the moment the first modern populations set foot in their territories,” a completely implausible scenario, they say, it is now “totally inescapable” Neanderthals and modern humans knew each other and coexisted for a long time.The authors in this last item attribute criticisms of the interstratification theory to “a long-standing agenda to deny the possibility of significant chronological overlap and coexistence between late Neanderthal and early anatomically modern populations in western Europe, and therefore to deny any suggestion of potential mutual interaction or ‘acculturation’ between the two populations,” they asserted.  With so many cases like these above, one can begin to meditate on what other agendas might operate to deny the possibility of keeping observations synchronized with theory.1Organ, Shedlock, Meade, Pagel and Edwards, “Origin of avian genome size and structure in non-avian dinosaurs,” Nature 446, 180-184 (8 March 2007) | doi:10.1038/nature05621.1aCarl Zimmer, “Evolution: Jurassic Genome,” Science, 9 March 2007: Vol. 315. no. 5817, pp. 1358-1359, DOI: 10.1126/science.315.5817.1358.2Raby, Alexis, Dixon and Clayton, “Planning for the future by western scrub-jays,” Nature 445, 919-921 (22 February 2007) | doi:10.1038/nature05575.3Mellars, Gravina and Ramsey, “Confirmation of Neanderthal/modern human interstratification at the Chatelperronian type-site,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0608053104, published online before print February 21, 2007.The evolutionists can’t seem to get anything right.  No matter where they look, organisms aren’t cooperating with Charlie’s expectations.  What’s really naked here, the jay bird or Darwin’s little storytelling parade?  Is evolutionary theory really good for anything?  Did not Darwin foist a fruitless path of inquiry on science?  Aren’t his disciples clueless?  Don’t they deserve to be called on the carpet and reprimanded for pretending to have scientific knowledge when the evidence is against them?  We retort; you deride.(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Changes made to rules on applying fertilizer

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Take a whole class or just take the test, which is better? Farmers will get to decide.Those who apply fertilizer on 50 or more acres now have the option to take an exam or attend a three-hour course to get the required certification aimed at protecting water quality.The exam is a new option the Ohio Department of Agriculture will offer to make it easier for farmers to get certified and yet ensure that those who are applying fertilizer know the safest measures. The exam option was one of the rule changes on fertilizer certification that went into effect Oct. 1.The other changes include the following:Those renewing their fertilizer certificate, which must be done every three years, must either pass a fertilizer exam or take a one-hour class. Previously, the recertification class was two hours.Two new items were added to the required records that certified fertilizer applicators must keep: Now they must record the number of acres where they applied fertilizer and the total amount of fertilizer applied.Only one person at a farm or business needs to be certified to apply fertilizer. A family member or employee of the certificate holder can apply fertilizer under their direct supervision, meaning the certificate holder has instructed that person where, when and how to apply fertilizer, and is no farther than 25 miles away or within two hours travel of the applicator working under their direct supervision. The rule change clarified that provision.Certificate holders who do not also hold a license to apply pesticide will see their fertilizer certificate period change to April 1 to March 31. Previously, it was June 1 to May 31. The new cycle is aimed at ensuring that certifications will generally be in place prior to the planting season.A grace period of 180 days is offered to certificate holders who do not send in their application and payment prior to the date their certificate expires. However, in renewing their certificate, the applicant has to have completed the required training or test before March 31.Since Sept. 30, growers who apply fertilizer to more than 50 acres have been required to be certified, a measure aimed at keeping nutrients from farm fields from contributing to algal blooms in Lake Erie and other bodies of water. Phosphorus and nitrogen in fertilizer can trigger the growth of algal blooms. Those blooms produce toxins in the water, making it unsafe to swim in or drink. And as the blooms decompose, they take oxygen from the water, depleting the supply available for other aquatic life. The extent of 2017 algal blooms in Lake Erie was the fourth most severe in recent history, according to a November report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.All the recent changes are aimed at making the certification process less burdensome on farmers, said Peggy Hall, agricultural and resource law field specialist for Ohio State University Extension.OSU Extension provides training for applying fertilizer, focusing on teaching how to apply fertilizer at the correct rate, time and location in the field, to keep nutrients in the field and available to crops while increasing stewardship of nearby and downstream water resources.“The goal of the entire program is that we constantly educate ourselves about how we are applying these fertilizers and make sure we understand the science behind it,” Hall said.“Hopefully more education, more understanding and continued research will help with the runoff issue.”Across Ohio, an estimated 3,700 private fertilizer applicators have certificates expiring in March 2018, according to records from the Ohio Department of Agriculture.OSU Extension will begin offering recertification programs in nearly every county this fall and winter, said Mary Ann Rose, program director for OSU Extension’s Pesticide Safety Education Program.“Most of the fertilizer recertification programs will be offered in combination with pesticide recertification meetings; farmers will have the option to attend either or both,” Rose said.For more information, visit agri.ohio.gov/apps/odaprs/pestfert-PRS-index.aspx and nutrienteducation.osu.edulast_img read more

Choosing an Air Barrier and a Housewrap

first_imgIn the midst of framing his new house, Joe Norm has switched gears and opted out of Zip System sheathing in favor of CDX plywood. The question he faces now is how he should air seal the exterior side of the walls—tape the seams between sheets of plywood, or tape the seams of the water-resistive barrier (WRB) he installs over the sheathing? More to the point, will a common WRB like DuPont’s Tyvek be good enough, or should he be prepared to spend more on an “exotic” product? “I priced out VaproShield IT and it looks to be 3x the cost of Tyvek,” Joe writes in a Q&A post. “Solitex Mento looks to be about 2x the cost. Why are these products so much more and how are they justified over Tyvek?” That’s where we start this Q&A Spotlight.RELATED ARTICLESA New Encyclopedia Article on Water-Resistive BarriersThe Complicated Role of a Water-Resistive BarrierKeeping Water Out of Walls: Housewrap and BeyondA Canadian Couple Needs Help Choosing a Heating SystemCombining Sheathing With a WRB and Air Barrier Staple-up WRBs are not the best air barriers GBA Editor Brian Pontolilo has just finished a series of blogs on WRBs and has come to at least one conclusion: “There is no easy answer when it comes to the performance of individual products.” In order to win code approval, a WRB must pass certain criteria of the International Code Council’s Evaluation Service. Reports on test results offer only limited information, but Pontolilo adds that there are better choices for an air barrier than a staple-up housewrap. “It is well known that staple-up housewraps like Tyvek don’t make the best air barriers,” he says. “At least they are challenging, at best, to detail as an air barrier. If you choose this type of product, taping the plywood seams is a more straightforward approach to air sealing.” If Norm wants his WRB to double duty as an air barrier, Pontolilo would recommend the Zip System sheathing, peel-and-stick membranes, or liquid-applied products instead. Beyond the question of which WRB to use, Pontolilo adds, is the importance of including a ventilated rainscreen in the design. Tighter houses need better WRBs Houses with drafty exteriors can tolerate water more readily than tight houses, AlexPoi writes. If Norm is building a tight house, he’ll be better off with a high-quality WRB. “A little bit of water in a leaky house is not a problem because air movement will dry the sheathing pretty quickly if it gets wet,” AlexPoi says. But when the house is tight, and air movement through the walls is limited, is takes longer for moisture to dissipate. “So, if you are building a tight house with OSB sheathing in a wet climate, I would personally not take the risk to cheap out on the WRB just for the peace of mind,” AlexPoi continues. “After all, a good WRB will cost you just a couple of thousand more but could save you big time.” AlexPoi suggests Norm pay particular attention to flashing details to keep bulk water out. Sheathing makes a robust air barrier Andrew C believes that taping the seams of the plywood sheathing is Norm’s best bet for a durable air barrier. “Properly detailed, the WRB can be a belt-and-suspenders backup air barrier to the taped sheathing, but the sheathing remains primary,” Andrew C writes. “As others have pointed out, flashing design details and attention to these details, along with avoiding dumb designs like dead-ending a roof valley into a wall, are critical to durability.” To Andrew C, a wall design with taped plywood and Tyvek CommercialWrap (a suggestion from Malcolm Taylor as a more durable alternative than Tyvek) makes the most sense. Why opt out of Zip System sheathing? Norm opened his original question by noting that he had decided against using Zip System sheathing, an OSB product with an integral WRB from Huber Engineered Woods that has become increasingly common on both walls and roofs. How come? Patrick O’Sullivan wants to know. “No good reason really,” Norm replies. “I’m not fond of OSB in general and I couldn’t totally get past the idea of hundreds of feet of reverse laps for water to get caught up in. I”m sure Zip is great and in the end I may regret not trying it out.” Even though Taylor thinks taped plywood sheathing and a WRB in sheet form would be a good route, he also thinks Zip Sheathing is worth considering. “Zip-R [a version of the sheathing bonded to a layer of foam insulation] makes some sense to me, and I’m pretty sure Zip will turn out to be a good long-term sheathing/WRB,” he says. But when it comes to choosing a particular WRB, Taylor says that as long as it is installed “diligently,” he hasn’t seen anything suggesting one WRB is significantly better than another. As to the long-term durability of plywood vs. OSB, a question that Zerphyr7 raises, Alex P refers him to an Instagram photo posted by architect Steve Baczek showing two small pieces of Zip sheathing taped together with Zip tape that have been left outside for a decade. “He says the tape is perfectly fine and the edges have swollen a little with full exposure to rain, ice and snow,” Alex P says. Our expert’s opinion GBA Technical Director Peter Yost adds this: I like to keep the air barrier and the water-resistive barrier together so that at penetrations I can seal both in the same plane or location. On the topic of ventilated rainscreens, for all but the driest of climates, I strongly prefer a free-draining and airflow-promoting gap (open top and bottom) between the cladding and the WRB. The one situation that no code-approved test for WRBs requires is water held in tension between the claddings and the WRBs (no gap between them). I have seen this water held in tension result in wet sheathing with a variety of different WRBs. Quite some time ago now, Paul Fisette—now retired, but then head of the Wood Technology and Construction program at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst—worked up a test for water held in tension. You can read that report here. Paul was a “wingnut” long before I codified that term on BuildingGreen and then with Martin’s help here on GBA . On a side note, does WRB stand for “water-resistive barrier,” “water-resistant barrier,” “weather-resistant barrier,” or “weather-resistive barrier?” In the 2018 International Residential Code (IRC), these terms are used interchangeably: water-resistive barrier 30 times, water-resistant barrier six times, weather-resistant barrier three times, and weather-resistive barrier twice. That is just odd. Even more odd is to use the terms “resistive” and “resistant”—both meaning some level of opposition—with the term “barrier,” which means an absolute stop or block. In our industry, we certainly struggle with water and weather, even in our terminology.last_img read more

Hurriyat chief Geelani hospitalised

first_imgHardline Kashmiri separatist leader Syed Ali Shah Geelani was hospitalised here on Sunday due to ill health.The Hurriyat Conference chairman was shifted to SKIMS hospital after he complained of abdominal cramps, dehydration and weakness, a Hurriyat spokesman said.He said Mr. Geelani has been admitted at the hospital and is under observation. He added, there is “nothing serious” as far as the Hurriyat hawk’s health is concerned. The octogenarian leader has been under house arrest in his uptown Hyderpora residence here for over an year.last_img read more

Canada 10 other countries will move forward on a new TPP after

first_imgCanada and 10 other countries agreed this weekend to re-evaluate the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the controversial trade deal that has been assumed dead since the U.S. pulled out in January.However a Canadian group opposed to the TPP says the deal should not be revived.Trade officials said the deal would change significantly without American involvement, although leaders from the 11 remaining countries are still figuring out what a revised trade plan would look like.In its current form, the partnership requires U.S. participation before it can go into effect. But a revised TPP wouldn’t be as simple as taking the U.S. out of the existing deal: each of the 11 remaining countries will have to re-evaluate its own trade needs absent of American involvement.Ministers attending the Asia-Pacific Economic Conference (APEC) in Hanoi, Vietnam this weekend discussed taking another look at the terms of the deal. Officials from the countries involved, which include Australia, Malaysia, Mexico, and Singapore, among others, have agreed to present assessments to their leaders when they meet for an annual APEC summit in Vietnam in November, which will also include U.S. President Donald Trump, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping.Since the U.S withdrawal, Japan and New Zealand have been spearheading efforts to revive the deal. Both countries have ratified the agreement and moved forward on legislation related to the deal. But Canadian officials stress that even the countries most enthusiastic about the previous agreement understand that it must be significantly altered before it can move forward.New Zealand Trade Minister Todd McClay said the remaining countries are open to others joining provided they accept the trade agreement’s high standards on labour and environmental protection. He said the door remains open to the U.S., even after President Donald Trump withdrew from the pact in January, saying he prefers bilateral free trade deals.Supporters of the agreement argue that opening the Canadian economy to foreign markets could benefit sectors including forestry, manufacturing and agriculture, especially production of canola, beef and pork. But there are also concerns about intellectual property provisions, including patent extensions, as well as the potential for job loss within Canada.Sujata Dey, trade campaigner for the social action organization The Council of Canadians, called the TPP “a huge corporate power grab” that should be abandoned completely rather than re-worked. The group takes particular issue with the policy’s investor-state dispute settlement, which allows companies to sue governments over any regulations that reduce their profits.“These trade agreements are old-school because our world problems have changed,” Dey said, citing environmental crises. “Until we stop copying and cutting the old trade agreement that we’ve been doing for the last 30 years, it’s not going to be a trade agreement that works for our new reality.”In response, a Liberal government official who did not want to be named indicated that the concerns of Canadians will be taken into account in formulating a new deal. Trying to sell a new version of the TPP to the public that doesn’t include free and progressive fair trade would be an uphill battle for the federal government, he said.The China-led 16-member Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership will meet Monday in Hanoi to further discussions on a separate deal seen as an alternative to the TPP. It is expected to be finalized by the end of this year.With files from the Associated Presslast_img read more