Fitzgibbon Cup action this afternoon

first_imgDIT will face Mary I today, while UL host NUIG in Limerick and GMIT take-on UUJ in Carnmore.Those games will all throw-in at 2 o’clock today, while there’s a half-past two start at the Mardyke where UCC will face LIT.There’s a further three matches later this evening as Maynooth University travel to Belfield to take-on UCD while DCU host local rivals St Pats/Mater Dei and IT Carlow go up against Waterford IT. Those matches will all get underway at 7pm.last_img

Caster Semenya signs for South African football team

first_imgTwo-time Olympic 800m gold medallist Caster Semenya has joined a South African women’s football team.The 28-year-old is unable to compete without taking testosterone-reducing drugs following a rule change by the IAAF, athletics’ governing body.It means she cannot defend her 800m World Championship title in Doha this month – though she is fighting the rule change through the courts.She is now training with Gauteng-based women’s football club JVW.The three-time world champion, who announced in July that she would not be defending her 800m world title, cannot start playing for JVW until the 2020 season, having joined outside the South African transfer window.“I am looking forward to this new journey, I appreciate the love and support I already get from the team,” Semenya told the club website. JVW FC, was formed in 2013 by current South Africa Women’s captain, Janine van Wyk, aiming to “identify, develop, improve and expose” female footballers.The club is one of the top sides in the league for Gauteng province – the main women’s football league in South Africa is split into nine provincial competitions.Club founder Van Wyk said she was “absolutely honoured” that Semenya had chosen JVW “as the club where she would like to start showcasing her football skills”.She told the BBC: “She is signing with the team to play in 2020 as the transfer window is currently closed for this season. She is part of the team.”Semenya is not the first athlete to switch to football – after retiring in 2017, Usain Bolt trained with Norwegian club Stromsgodset and Australian side Central Coast Mariners, but did not secure a contract. Semenya is also following in the footsteps of her former coach Maria Mutola, who also turned to football after athletics.The IAAF introduced its rule change because it argues female athletes with differences of sexual development (DSD) – such as Semenya – have “a competitive advantage”.Athletes must either take testosterone-reducing medication in order to compete in track events from 400m to the mile or change to another distance.last_img read more

ScienceShot: What Killed Larsen B?

first_imgIn early 2002, a 200-meter-thick, Rhode Island–sized floating mass of ice attached to the Antarctic Peninsula unexpectedly shattered and floated away in a matter of weeks. While researchers quickly linked the breakup to lakes of meltwater that had accumulated on the so-called Larsen B ice shelf’s upper surface and then wedged apart deep crevasses, they hadn’t come up with a convincing explanation for what triggered the collapse. Now, a new analysis in Geophysical Research Letters suggests that the sudden drainage of one or more of those lakes, and not merely their presence, set off the disintegration. The team’s analyses show that when a meltwater lake drains through the ice sheet into the underlying sea, the ice nearby, suddenly relieved of the water’s weight, springs upward. That changes the patterns of stress in the ice, which ripple across the ice shelf and can cause nearby lakes to drain, setting up a chain reaction by which the entire lake-ridden portion of the ice shelf can splinter. Just before the collapse and its aftermath (shown as icebergs were dispersing on 7 March 2002), satellite images showed more than 2700 meltwater lakes on Larsen B’s surface. All of those lakes mysteriously and simultaneously drained just before the breakup commenced—a possible warning sign for future ice shelf collapses, the team contends.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Australia A thump South Africa A by 108 runs

first_imgSouth Africa A’s batting crumbled under pressure as Australia A pulled off a massive 108-run victory in the ongoing 50-over tri-series at the M.A. Chidambaram stadium here on Wednesday.Chasing Australia A’s 272, South Africa A team kept losing wickets at regular intervals and could only manage 164 in 37.1 overs.Heading into the rescheduled fifth encounter of the series which also involves India A, South Africa A fielded a strong unit as most of the players barring Quinton de Kock regained full fitness after a food poisoning incident in the last match.South Africa A skipper Dean Elgar top scored for his side with 64, but it wasn’t enough. Australia A’s Ashton Agar (3/41) and leg-spinner Cameron Boyce (3/48) took three wickets each. With the loss South Africa A are out of the tournament.South Africa A did not recover from the early jolt as Agar and Boyce kept them on a tight leash. Only skipper Elgar fought back with a few hefty blows en route to his 64, but then fell attempting a slog-sweep.Khaya Zondo tried hard with a knock of 47, but once he got out the lower order failed to deliver with the last four batsmen contributing just two runs with their willow.Earlier, Australia A posted a strong total of 27 runs riding on the century (130) captain Matthew Wade made. Wade was well supported by Peter Handscomb (52).Pacer Lonwabo Tsotsobe returned with figures of 3/50 from his nine overs as Australia lost their last five wickets for 70 runs, ending with 272 in 47.2 overs.Brief scores:advertisementAustralia A 272 all out (Matthew Wade 130, Peter Handscomb 52; Lonwabo Tsotsobe 3/50) vs South Africa A 164 all out (Dean Elgar 64; Ashton Agar 3/41, Cameron Boyce 3/48)last_img read more