Alexa Romero sets new career-high in strikeouts as Syracuse beats Elon, 4-2

first_imgSyracuse (13-7, 2-1 Atlantic Coast) defeated Elon (13-9), 4-2, on Tuesday evening at Hunt Softball Park in Elon, North Carolina, thanks in part to another strong performance from its ace, Alexa Romero. The Orange dominated both in the batter’s box and in the circle throughout the game, out-hitting the Phoenix nine to two while Romero struck out a career-high 13 batters to Elon’s six. The output broke her previous best of 12, which came against the University of Texas at San Antonio on Feb. 24.Romero started the game unlike her usual self. In the bottom of the first, the sophomore allowed a walk and a single in her first two batters. After a sacrifice bunt advanced the runners to second and third, Romero rediscovered her form by striking out the next two batters to end the inning and escape the jam.After an atypical first inning, Romero returned to the top of her game. She pitched five scoreless innings before Elon’s Ally Repko hit a two-run home run in the bottom of the seventh. Romero went on to register her 13th strikeout on the last batter of the game. The sophomore improved to 9-4 on the season.Syracuse got on the board early after singles from Alicia Hansen and Bryce Holmgren put runners on the corners and a double steal gave SU its first run of the game. Later in the at-bat, Gabby Teran singled to right field to drive in Holmgren, extending the Orange’s lead to two. Holmgren’s single marked the eighth straight game the junior has recorded a hit.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter recording two hits over the next three innings, Syracuse’s offense was revitalized in the fifth. Again, Hansen and Holmgren got on base to start the inning, before Lailoni Mayfield belted a two-RBI double to left-center to give SU a 4-0 advantage. Holmgren’s second hit in the fifth meant her ninth multi-hit game this season.Syracuse will resume conference play on Friday with the first of a three-game series against Virginia. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 13, 2018 at 7:52 pm Contact David: ddschnei@syr.edulast_img read more

Canada 10 other countries will move forward on a new TPP after

first_imgCanada and 10 other countries agreed this weekend to re-evaluate the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the controversial trade deal that has been assumed dead since the U.S. pulled out in January.However a Canadian group opposed to the TPP says the deal should not be revived.Trade officials said the deal would change significantly without American involvement, although leaders from the 11 remaining countries are still figuring out what a revised trade plan would look like.In its current form, the partnership requires U.S. participation before it can go into effect. But a revised TPP wouldn’t be as simple as taking the U.S. out of the existing deal: each of the 11 remaining countries will have to re-evaluate its own trade needs absent of American involvement.Ministers attending the Asia-Pacific Economic Conference (APEC) in Hanoi, Vietnam this weekend discussed taking another look at the terms of the deal. Officials from the countries involved, which include Australia, Malaysia, Mexico, and Singapore, among others, have agreed to present assessments to their leaders when they meet for an annual APEC summit in Vietnam in November, which will also include U.S. President Donald Trump, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping.Since the U.S withdrawal, Japan and New Zealand have been spearheading efforts to revive the deal. Both countries have ratified the agreement and moved forward on legislation related to the deal. But Canadian officials stress that even the countries most enthusiastic about the previous agreement understand that it must be significantly altered before it can move forward.New Zealand Trade Minister Todd McClay said the remaining countries are open to others joining provided they accept the trade agreement’s high standards on labour and environmental protection. He said the door remains open to the U.S., even after President Donald Trump withdrew from the pact in January, saying he prefers bilateral free trade deals.Supporters of the agreement argue that opening the Canadian economy to foreign markets could benefit sectors including forestry, manufacturing and agriculture, especially production of canola, beef and pork. But there are also concerns about intellectual property provisions, including patent extensions, as well as the potential for job loss within Canada.Sujata Dey, trade campaigner for the social action organization The Council of Canadians, called the TPP “a huge corporate power grab” that should be abandoned completely rather than re-worked. The group takes particular issue with the policy’s investor-state dispute settlement, which allows companies to sue governments over any regulations that reduce their profits.“These trade agreements are old-school because our world problems have changed,” Dey said, citing environmental crises. “Until we stop copying and cutting the old trade agreement that we’ve been doing for the last 30 years, it’s not going to be a trade agreement that works for our new reality.”In response, a Liberal government official who did not want to be named indicated that the concerns of Canadians will be taken into account in formulating a new deal. Trying to sell a new version of the TPP to the public that doesn’t include free and progressive fair trade would be an uphill battle for the federal government, he said.The China-led 16-member Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership will meet Monday in Hanoi to further discussions on a separate deal seen as an alternative to the TPP. It is expected to be finalized by the end of this year.With files from the Associated Presslast_img read more