ALL LOVE: After being written out of history, Syracuse 8’s forgiveness defines them

first_imgFifty years ago, nine SU football players boycotted spring practices because their demands for equitable treatment weren’t being met by the athletic department and head coach Ben Schwartzwalder. This the final installment of a three-part series tells the stories of the following scholar athletes who risked their futures for what was right: Dana Harrell, John Lobon, Richard Bulls, Duane Walker, John Godbolt, Ron Womack, Clarence McGill, Greg Allen and Alif Muhammad.Dana Harrell’s voice cracked as he addressed a rise of hatred in his alma mater’s community. At that point, Syracuse had been hit with six reported hate incidents in nine days. Seven more were reported in the next five days, including five more that evening, on Nov. 16.Students have protested Syracuse University’s response to what grew to be at least 32 hate incidents on and around campus. Harrell, though, was “proud” of SU for wrestling with the issue of racism.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Syracuse University does not condone racism,” Harrell said. “They do not condone it. They do not ignore racism.”Fifty years ago, it was Harrell who was provoked by his white teammates wielding a garden hose in a racist altercation, who had to change his natural position because quarterback was deemed a “thinking position,” who filed multiple complaints against head coach Ben Schwartzwalder to the Onondaga County Human Rights Commission.What hurt possibly even more than any injustice the Syracuse 8 collectively experienced was the feeling of being “written out of history” for more than three decades, they said. It took 35 years for the university “to hear our side of the story,” Alif Muhammad said.Harrell sees SU as a microcosm of the United States; its problems weren’t — and aren’t — unique. For everything Syracuse took from Harrell in 1970, he believes it gave him just as much: Two degrees, a wife and unbreakable bonds with the teammates he boycotted alongside.Though SU did not properly recognize the Syracuse 8 until 2006, Harrell and the other members “bleed orange” as much as any alumni. Many of them wear Syracuse gear and root for the Orange, send their children or grandchildren to SU and are still involved with the university.“It is a contradiction,” said Clarence McGill, who for years planned on never returning to campus. “But what happened here was a reality that all of us wouldn’t have been successful without that scholarship that was given to us by Ben Schwartzwalder.”,In 2005, at the triennial Coming Back Together reunion for Black and Latino alumni, some Syracuse 8 members led a workshop and retold their story. In attendance was Hall of Famer and former Syracuse football star Art Monk, who graduated in 1980. He’d never heard of the Syracuse 8.“So, when we told the story then, and hearing Art say that he didn’t know that happened here, that tells you exactly what occurred,” John Lobon said. “Nobody knew what happened because that’s how far it got buried.”The reunion was the first step in uncovering their previously hidden history. Nancy Cantor, then the university’s chancellor, attended the reunion that year and had previously read about the Syracuse 8. She said then that SU should find a way to apologize.One year later, it did. Every member of the Syracuse 8, except John Godbolt, walked onto the Carrier Dome turf at halftime of a late October game and received their letterman jacket for the first time. Cantor presented them a formal apology and the Chancellor’s Medal — the university’s highest honor. Jim Brown spoke, calling it “one of the greatest nights I have been involved in.”“It was a beautiful experience,” Ron Womack said. “I will never forget that. It helped mend some of the pain. It almost was like we felt validated, that we did belong to Syracuse … We went from troublemakers to heroes.”The university’s apology healed the scars left by the “hurtful chapter” of their boycott and SU’s subsequent neglect, Womack said. To this day, Womack wears his graduation ring, which has a picture of a football player on one side and his major, education, on the other. He shows it off to his students in Minnesota while passing on the lessons of the 1970 boycott.So, when we told the story then, and hearing Art say that he didn’t know that happened here, that tells you exactly what occurred. Nobody knew what happened because that’s how far it got buried.John Lobon, Syracuse 8 member`Since 2006, the Syracuse 8 has been chronicled in David Marc’s book “Leveling the Playing Field: The Story of the Syracuse 8,” published by Syracuse University Press, in SU’s 150th anniversary book “Forever Orange” and in a Carrier Dome display.The Syracuse 8 view their boycott as a renaissance, a return to SU’s founders’ mission of inclusion and opportunity for all, and they’re still trying to make SU better. In 2011, the Syracuse 8 started and endowed a scholarship fund for first-year Black or Latino students who’ve exhibited leadership skills and participated in community service during high school.They consider their 1970 boycott a “catalyst” for social justice initiatives and increased diversity in the student body, administration and faculty, Greg Allen said. In fall 2020, they’ll be honored once again for the 50th anniversary at the 13th Coming Back Together. As of now, the reunion is still on despite the spread of COVID-19, and the Syracuse 8 will host a panel to retell their story.,“Man, I love Syracuse,” Muhammad said. “The boycott was something we felt we had to do what was right to try to make things better. But we love Syracuse.”Eight of the nine boycotters graduated from SU, and four went on to earn master’s degrees. Allen serves on the Board of Visitors of Syracuse’s School of Education and wants his granddaughter to attend SU — as does Lobon. Womack completed the coursework for a Syracuse Ph.D. but never finished his dissertation, and Harrell went to SU’s law school.As Harrell’s children grew up, they’d get irritated with him because he’d bring them to Syracuse’s campus so frequently — you can only see Marshall Street and the Carrier Dome so many times. Even before Harrell fielded questions about his time at Syracuse, he strategically asked when this series would run, fearing a story might distract the team from spring practice or the upcoming season.“I am so committed to Syracuse. I just want to make sure everything’s positive for this team,” he said on Aug. 14.They love a program that, for decades, wanted nothing to do with them. They give back to the school that stole their opportunities, college experiences and freedom. They became scholars when institutional racism took away their athletic careers.For as much of their story is one of sacrifice, it’s also one of forgiveness.In memory of Duane Walker (1949-2010), John Godbolt (1949-2012), and Richard Bulls (1951-2010).Cover photo illustration by Talia Trackim | Presentation DirectorPhotos courtesy of Syracuse 8 Collection, Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries Published on April 26, 2020 at 9:06 pm Contact Danny: dremerma@syr.edu | @DannyEmerman,Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment. Commentslast_img

UFC: Joe Lauzon to not fight again in the competition?

first_img 10 months ago UFC: The biggest dream matches that never happened inside the cage COMMENT Raj Sarkar It is really a piece of sad news for MMA fans that Joe Lauzon might not fight in UFC again. After having a spectacular knockout win against Jonathan Pearce in the recently happened UFC Boston the entire MMA community wanted him to see inside the octagon again but it has minimal probability now. In a recent interview, UFC President Dana White has confirmed that the contract between Lauzon and UFC has ended and they don’t want to renew it for the American martial artist.Also Read- UFC: Conor McGregor Has Been Named As The Richest Fighter Of UFCUFC: Joe Lauzon’s UFC contract ended?According to President Dana White, they had a contract with Joe Lauzon which stated that with a win, lose, or draw Lauzon is not going to fight further in UFC. Lauzon knocked out debutant Jonathan Pearce in the very first round of UFC Boston and he feels that he can still fight. Joe Lauzon agreed upon the special agreement he had with UFC but as per his words, he would have never fought in UFC again only if he would have failed to perform against Jonathan Pearce. According to reports, Joe Lauzon contacted Dana White after UFC Boston and wanted to appear again but Dana showed no interest in Lauzon. After the fight, Lauzon shared a happy moment with his teammates but Dana White was actually expecting a retirement speech from him. However, Lauzon said that he is not going to argue with the UFC president and might take up the retirement on a good note. Also Read- WWE: Seth Rollins Slammed By UFC Interim Champion Colby CovingtonUFC: Joe Lauzon’s recent statisticsThe American martial artist is extremely skilled with 28 wins and 15 losses and has 26 stoppages among his 28 wins. However, in the recent tenure, he had a lot of losses. He came back to the win column after facing three back to back losses against Chris Gruetzemacher, Clay Guida and Stevie Ray. These losses might have impacted his reputation and Dana might have lost his interest over Joe Lauzon. Despite his loses, Joe Lauzon remains to be one of the loved martial artists of all time. 10 months ago UFC: Conor McGregor has been named as the richest fighter of UFC SUBSCRIBE TO US First Published: 24th October, 2019 16:58 IST WE RECOMMEND LIVE TVcenter_img WATCH US LIVE 10 months ago UFC: Jose Aldo looks shreded in new shape for bantamweight division Written By 10 months ago UFC: Jose Aldo loses weight for bantamweight division; Slams Cejudo Last Updated: 24th October, 2019 16:58 IST UFC: Joe Lauzon To Not Fight Again In The Competition? Joe Lauzon might not fight in UFC again despite knocking out Jonathan Pearce in UFC Boston. Dana White does not want to offer him a contract, know more. FOLLOW US 10 months ago UFC: Yair Rodriguez and Jeremy Stephens channel anger before fight Also Read- UFC: Mackenzie Dern Might Make Her Comeback In February Next YearAlso Read- UFC: Khabib Nurmagomedov Plans To Retire In The Next 2 Years From MMA last_img read more

Guyana union rejects government wage offer

first_imgThe Guyana Public Service Union (GPSU) has rejected an offer made by the David Granger administration for salary increases for public servants to be effective this year.However, government representatives, said the government is doing its best to meet workers demand.“The government has given an offer for 2017, again, it’s based on last year’s formula and, in fact, the government can only give an offer that the economy can afford at this point in time,” said Reginald Brotherson, the head of the Department of Public Service, who is leading the government’s negotiating team.Brotherson said that the discussions, which commenced on September 26, were cordial, frank and open and that the government team has also agreed to start looking at allowances, particularly those allowances that have not been changed for almost three decades.The two parties are expected to meet again next week, and Brotherson said that the government is hoping to have the negotiations concluded ahead of the presentation of the 2018 budget.last_img read more

Monday August 26th Local Sports

first_imgMINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The first-place Minnesota Twins didn’t get many hits off Detroit starter Matthew Boyd, but they certainly made them count.C.J. Cron and Jonathan Schoop homered, Martín Pérez pitched six solid innings and Minnesota beat the last-place Detroit Tigers 7-4 on Sunday to win two of three in the weekend series.Minnesota increased its AL Central lead to 3½ games over the Cleveland Indians, who lost at home to Kansas City 9-8 in 10 innings.Cron’s three-run shot to center field broke open a 2-0 game in the fourth and gave Pérez (9-5) plenty of cushion to work with. The left-hander allowed two runs and five hits for his first win since July 5. It was the second time in his last three starts that Pérez went six innings and yielded two or fewer runs.The Twins now head off on a 10-day road trip that takes them to Chicago, Detroit and Boston. Their three-game series with the White Sox starts tomorrow night at 7:10. ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS — The NIACC volleyball team won their first four matches of the season over the weekend at the McHenry County College Invitational in Rockford, Illinois. On Friday, NIACC topped Kishwaukee College 3-0 (25-19, 25-13, 25-13) and Madison College 3-1 (22-25, 25-21, 26-24, 25-18). Sophomore Kennedy Meister had 36 kills and 24 digs while freshman Becca Steffens had 64 assists, 19 digs, 14 kills and six aces on Friday. On Saturday , NIACC had a 3-1 win (25-13, 22-25, 25-13, 25-21) over Oakton Community College and a 3-2 win (25-20, 25-18, 17-25, 13-25, 15-6) over Grand Rapids Community College. Meister once again led the Lady Trojans with 24 kills and 31 digs. NIACC returns to action this coming weekend at Southeastern’s Jimmy John Invitational in West Burlington. AMES —- Iowa State coach Matt Campbell says the focus in practice has shifted toward Northern Iowa. The Cyclones and Panthers meet in the season opener Saturday in Ames.Campbell says as game week approaches they have turned their attention toward UNI.Campbell says the Cyclones have for the most part remained injury free during practice. AMES — Iowa State’s young receiving corps will get its first test against UNI. Hakeem Butler left early for the NFL and quarterback Brock Purdy is working with several new wide outs.Purdy says the new receivers have made a lot of progress.Offensive coordinator Tom Manning says Purdy has done a good job of spreading the ball around in practice.Iowa State and UNI kick off at 11 o’clock on Saturday morning. MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Napheesa Collier and Danielle Robinson scored 23 points each and the Minnesota Lynx beat the Las Vegas Aces 98-77. Sylvia Fowles added 14 points for the Lynx (15-15), who shot 59 percent from the field and reduced their playoff-clinching magic number to one with four games to go.last_img read more