15yr-old American shocks Venus Williams at Australian Open

first_img The fast-rising Gauff, ranked 67 in the world, defeated the seven-time Grand Slam winner 7-6 (7⁄5), 6-3 at the Australian Open. The teenager, who will play unseeded Romanian Sorana Cirstea in round two in Melbourne, similarly beat the 39-year-old Venus in the Wimbledon first round last year. Gauff, touted as a long-term successor to Venus’s sister Serena, said the Williams siblings were her idols and she wants to emulate their trailblazing success. Warning that she can still improve “a lot”, Gauff said: “My mission is to be the greatest. That’s my goal, to win as many Grand Slams as possible.” Asked if she believes she can win her first Major over the next fortnight in Melbourne, Gauff replied: “If I go into a tournament thinking I’ll lose, then I’m going to lose… “I believe I can beat anyone, but I think that’s almost every player’s mentality. “The ones who are the great ones, they don’t really fear anyone. “You respect your opponent, but you can’t go into the match fearing someone because then you’re going to lose, and I don’t want to lose.” Playing under a roof as rain lashed the first Grand Slam of the year, Venus conceded the first-set tie break when she hit a routine backhand overhead into the net. Gauff, remarkably unfazed by playing someone more than twice her age, held her nerve in the second set to claim Venus’s scalp once more. Victory over Venus at Wimbledon and her run to the fourth round there – where she lost to eventual champion Simona Halep – propelled Gauff into the sporting limelight. She went on to win her first WTA title in October in Linz, Austria. Venus, a former number one but now 55 in the world, is tipping Gauff for the top. Gauff spent some of the off-season with Serena, who sailed through her Melbourne opener. “She clearly wants it, works very hard, is extremely mature for her age,” said Venus. “I think the sky’s the limit for her.” Gauff belied her tender years with her power, precision and composure, but said that she is a typical teenager in many respects. By her own admission she is “very active” on TikTok, the video sharing social media network. “I procrastinate a lot on that app. I have to do homework,” she said, a reminder that she is still school age. Read Also:Australian Open: Federer blasts lack of communication on smog “Everyone thinks I’m so serious because of my on-court (demeanour). “Really I’m not. I don’t really take life too seriously, I just like to have fun.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Fifteen-year-old American Coco Gauff said she’s on “a mission to be the greatest” on Monday after stunning veteran Venus Williams once again in the first round of a Grand Slam. Loading… Promoted ContentWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?10 Of The Dirtiest Seas In The WorldTV Characters Who Hated Each Other But Later Became FriendsLaugh, Cry, Or Just Relax With The Best Series Streaming On HBO7 Non-Obvious Things That Damage Your PhoneDid You Know There’s A Black Hole In The Milky Way?6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes7 Facts About Black Holes That Will Blow Your Mind11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table TopInsane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street Art10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parkslast_img read more

UW struggles in road win

first_imgIOWA CITY, Iowa — Winning on the road in the Big Ten is never easy, and the No. 11 Wisconsin volleyball team showed exactly how hard it is to win away from home in their four game struggle against Iowa, winning 30-19, 26-30, 30-24, 30-21. “Iowa is one of those dangerous teams that is at the bottom of the conference but they fight like it is going to be the end of the world,” head coach Pete Waite said. “They have their backs against the wall, and that’s a dangerous team.”While the Badgers beat the Hawkeyes in almost every statistical category, it was evident that they are still not as comfortable playing on the road as they are at home.”It is one of the things we’ve been working on and struggling with this year is playing as well on the road as we do at home,” senior middle blocker and assistant captain Amy Bladow said. “We really talked about that after Minnesota, and it’s one of the things we wanted to work on tonight.”Wisconsin was able to come out in game one and jump right on Iowa, as they never trailed after taking a 3-2 lead. The Badgers were able to hold the Hawkeyes to a .068 hitting percentage in game one while they hit .286 and were led by freshman Brittney Dolgner with a game-high six kills. Game two started similarly with Wisconsin grabbing an early lead but things quickly turned south. With the Badgers trailing 15-10, Waite decided to put his senior captain Katie Lorenzen in — playing for the first time in Big Ten play — looking for a spark to get the team back in the game.”Lorenzen came in and did a nice job of changing the tempo of the game,” Waite said. “Jackie (Simpson) wasn’t doing anything too badly, it was just we needed a change out there and she did come in and kick started the team.” With Lorenzen running the offense, the Badgers were able to pull within two at 27-25 after a kill by Audra Jeffers, but Iowa went on a 3-1 run to end the game. Senior floor captain, Maria Carlini — who was scheduled to have the night off — was put in the starting lineup to start game three in an effort to boost the Badger’s offense. Carlini went on to have nine kills through two games. With Badgers down 2-6 to start game four, Waite went back to junior Jackie Simpson to try and spark the offense. The move worked as Wisconsin continued to peck away at the Iowa lead until they took the lead for good at 18-17.”The transition went really smoothly,” Bladow said. “When [Lorenzen] went in she did a really good job. She dug some really good balls, and blocked some really good balls and she obviously set really well. Then when [Simpson] went back in, it was the same thing. “I think it says a lot about both those girls that either of them can play, and it doesn’t affect our team energy. They both bring energy, and they both bring fire. They transition smoothly and will help us out a lot.”Both setters were able to spread the ball around as four Badgers finished with double-digit digs. Dolgner led all players with 25 kills, matching her career-high. Taylor Reineke, Bladow and Jeffers were also in double figures with 11, 11 and 10 kills respectively. “That is always our game plan [to spread the offensive],” Waite said. “If we do that, it’s really tough to stop the offense. The game we struggled in is probably not very balanced. We got [Dolgner] doing in the back row and that helped us.”Iowa was led on the night by sophomore outside-hitter Catherine Smale and junior right-side hitter Stacy Vitali with 15 and 11 kills respectively.While Wisconsin out-blocked Iowa 13-11, the Badgers did not have as good of night up at the net as they would have liked. “Iowa did a really good job of hitting around us,” Bladow said. “They roll shotted to the corners and they tipped a lot of balls and that really just makes our block ineffective.”One bright spot, however, was the blocking of Dolgner, who had five block assists on the night.”[Dolgner] had a couple good blocks tonight,” Waite said. “She is working on it everyday. We are watching tapes with her and we are showing things. It is a difficult thing going up against big hitters going at her, so for her to put up a couple bigger numbers, it helps us.”On the defensive side of the ball, Wisconsin out-dug Iowa 88-74. Junior libero Jocelyn Wack led all players with 25 digs. Junior Megan Mills and Dolgner also had double-digit digs with 15 and 14 respectively. The Hawkeyes were led by sophomore libero Emily Hiza with 21 digs.last_img read more