Politicians distract while doing wrong

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion I keep hearing outrage that the politicians we oppose should go to jail. We have found state politicians on both sides of aisle guilty of wrong-doing, but not many go to jail. Those we oppose are guilty of multiple wrong-doings, while those we support are victims of fake news. One party opposes gun rights; another women’s rights.And the parties will do nothing about either issue, for if they can keep people emotional about these footballs, they won’t pay attention to so many issues that affect our lives.Calvin MooreColonieMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

Better health care will lower abortions

first_imgThis isn’t because they want to have more abortions. It’s because their underfunded, substandard, erratic and chaotic health care leaves them little alternative. The situation is only likely to become worse as more red states line up to adopt Republican cuts in Medicaid that will make it even harder for poor women to get regular checkups.Because of limited medical options, low-income women have a much lower rate of effective contraception than women higher on the income scale. With regular gynecological care, there’s every reason to expect that poor women’s use of contraception would resemble that of other women in the United States.Unfortunately, that’s not currently the case. The result of ignoring poor women’s health needs is that we end up with approximately 600,000 more unplanned pregnancies and 300,000 more abortions each year than if we provided all women with accessible medical care.If we truly want to lower the abortion rate, we should be increasing funding for organizations such as Planned Parenthood. “De-fund Planned Parenthood” may be an effective slogan for whipping up the conservative base. But for the hundreds of thousands of additional fetuses that will be aborted each year due to wretched health care for low-income women, that slogan is a death sentence.Well-funded health care translates into vastly fewer abortions. Isn’t that what “pro-life” people say they want?Jacqueline DoneganSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Schenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departmentsSchenectady man dies following Cutler Street dirt bike crashEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, music Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionIf anti-abortion proponents really want to drastically reduce the number of abortions in America, instead of just using the issue to score political points, there is a straightforward solution: Provide decent health care for low-income women.In his book, “Sex and the Constitution,” University of Chicago constitutional scholar Geoffrey R. Stone notes that while poor women make up 15 percent of the population, they account for 42 percent of all abortions.last_img read more

Looking forward to serving on board

first_imgI have resided in the town of Glen since 1978, but — prior to last year — my commitment to my job in ethics, in addition to my commitment to take care of my ailing mother, never provided me adequate opportunity to actively participate in any local government functions. However, now retired (and no longer being a full-time caregiver, as my mother passed at the age of 95), I had the honor of being appointed to the town’s planning board by Supervisor John Thomas and the Town Board March 12.Three days later, I sat alongside my fellow Planning Board members for the first time. The members in attendance openly welcomed me as a neighbor and colleague. For that kindness and professional respect, I am grateful.It’s now my great privilege to take my seat on this board to serve my community – a duty I take very seriously. During the next seven years, I look forward to bringing transparency to the board, as well as being dedicated to dealing with facts while carefully listening to the thoughts and comments of my fellow residents; the people I now serve.Thank you for this opportunity, Supervisor Thomas. I truly appreciate you having asked me to serve my community. I am looking forward to the next seven years.Rosalie FarinaFultonvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesCuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccineEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Errors were evident in letters on climate

first_imgVictor Robert’s April 2 letter, where he points out a math error of Rodger Anderson in calculating the buildup of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, contains two errors: 1) The eight billion tons that humans add to the atmosphere are tons of carbon, not carbon dioxide, as stated in the letter. Secondly, Victor also makes a math error that many atmospheric science graduate students also make when dealing with concentrations of trace gases in air. The two parts per million (ppm) per year increase represents two ppm in the number of molecules, not mass, of the atmosphere. CO2 [carbon dioxide] is 1.52 times heavier than air, which is a mixture of mostly lighter O2 [oxygen] and N2 [nitrogen]. The observed two ppm increase in CO2 corresponds to a carbon mass of 4.3 billion metric tons, which is about half the mass of carbon emitted by fossil fuels.  Since the dawn of the industrial era, the oceans and the biosphere have been absorbing about half the CO2 added by burning fossil fuels each year.I think Mr. Anderson’s initial misstated calculations had to do with natural CO2 emissions from biosphere respiration. In the Northern Hemisphere, during winter (the eight-month period from September to the following May), CO2 levels rise by about nine ppm, as all life exhales CO2 and photosynthesis is minimized due to low sunlight and cold. During late spring-summer, CO2 levels fall by about seven ppm, when photosynthesis is more prevalent than respiration. Both of these increases and decreases are considerably larger than the two ppm increase from fossil fuels. It’s estimated that global respiration averaged over all seasons is probably greater than 150 billion metric tons carbon per year, which is about a factor of 15-20 times greater than fossil fuel emissions.Chris WalcekAlbanyThe writer is a research scientist, Atmospheric Sciences Research Center at University at Albany.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFeds: Albany man sentenced for role in romance scam Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Spitalfields scheme faces lengthy judicial review

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Mayhew calls for US-style planning gain solution

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National deal of the year

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Saville Gordon NAV shoots up

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ISVA and RICS to merge after 10-year debate

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Talk of the towns

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