Gold Coast real estate: Sanctuary Cove mansion records biggest sale of the week

Mrs Constable sketched the first floor plan then worked with an architect for months to turn it into their dream home. They made changes as they went along to improve the design, including a wood and glass staircase. “We had the staircase coming up the centre of the foyer but I sat down and designed (the existing) staircase myself,” Mrs Constable said. “We like it much, much better — it’s got more character to it.”But it’s the outdoor entertainment area with pool and barbecue overlooking the water they love most.“At Christmas time, we have had up to 24 people here,” Mr Constable said. MORE NEWS: Why this house is going viral The vendors pushed the boundaries when designing 2048 The Circle, Sanctuary Cove. “It was very modern in its time,” Mrs Constable told the Bulletin when it first hit the market earlier this year. “It’s still modern 10 years later so it was very out there when we first built it.” Stone, timber and neutral tones give it a sleek style while cutting-edge technology offers luxury appeal. The fireplace, bar, home theatre and master bedroom ensuite with spa are among its best features. MORE NEWS: Margot’s family home snapped up by early buyer They decided it was much too big for them and wanted to sell so they could travel. Matt Gates of Ray White Prestige handled the sale. Sanctuary Cove, a $2 billion masterplanned community at the heart of Hope Island, was established in 1986. It has two golf courses, a marina, a trendy retail precinct and 24-hour security. The 474ha gated enclave is designed around four harbours on the Coomera River.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:51Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:51 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p432p432p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenStarting your hunt for a dream home00:51 2048 The Circle, Sanctuary Cove from the air. Enjoy the fireplace. 2048 The Circle, Sanctuary Cove recorded the biggest sale on the Gold Coast this week, changing hands for $3.5 million.A SPRAWLING Sanctuary Cove property has sold for $3.5 million, the highest on the Gold Coast in the past week.Sellers Del and Les Constable designed and built the abstract home at 2048 The Circle in 2008, coming up with a design that challenged existing ideas of modern living. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa14 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago2048 The Circle, Sanctuary Cove Enjoy a waterfront lifestyle at 2048 The Circle, Sanctuary Cove. read more

Retirement living industry must change to meet demand

first_imgTanah Merah unit.“It is no longer just about aged care; it’s about choosing a lifestyle at the beginning of retirement that allows seniors to ‘age in place’ and provide a community for life,” he said. “Increasingly retirees are looking for options that allow them to access different levels of care if and when they are necessary. Aveo head of care Darren Sonter said that, coupled with more than 22 per cent of the population expected to be aged over 65 within the next 40 years, meant the industry was changing to meet lifestyle demand. Tennis centre to become retirement village RELATED: “The nature of the retirement community ensures residents are not pressured to locate elsewhere when their care needs change.’’ >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK<< Tanah Merah dining room.“Residents at Aveo Freedom Tanah Merah live in a community within their own self-contained home and are encouraged to get involved with daily activities,’’ she said. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours ago“The resident is empowered to choose how and when their care is delivered ensuring freedom of choice and independence whilst remaining within the communities they love.”Aveo Durack Aged Care registered nurse Christine Tronc said the Durack community was not just a residential area for elderly residents to live, it was their home. The Jetsons House of tomorrow Poolside at the Tanah Merah facility.According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, the average lifespan in Australia has increased from 70 years in 1960 to 82 years in 2016. MORE: Top tips to maximise space Aveo Durack aged care facility suite.“Aveo Durack Aged Care has a huge range of services onsite to ensure residents are cared for without the inconvenience of travelling outside the community, giving family and relatives peace of mind,” Ms Tronc said.Aveo Freedom Tanah Merah industry liaison clinician Kirsten Lanagan said their facility offered residents a lot of choices.last_img read more

Renovated Queenslander with top notch features

first_imgThe home at 45 Kate St, Woody Point. Picture: supplied.THIS renovated Queenslander has the benefit of cooling sea breezes and the ocean being within walking distance in three different directions. Owner David Walker said the property at 45 Kate St, Woody Point had undergone a massive transformation while still retaining plenty of character. “For an 80-year-old home it looks brand new,” he said. As part of the renovation the property was raised, the front veranda opened up, a back deck was added, a swimming pool was installed and the backyard was landscaped. The state-of-the-art kitchen has top end technology, lighting and appliances. Picture: supplied.A new kitchen was put in a year ago and the two bathrooms have been fully renovated. Mr Walker, who works at Kitchen Connection, said the kitchen gave the home wow factor. “It’s a state of the art kitchen. All the drawers and doors open electronically. You just touch them and they will automatically open and close.“The benchtops are top of the range super natural Caesarstone with waterfall edges and the appliances are top of the range Westinghouse. “There is a boiling water tap, so there is no need for a kettle, glass splashbacks and the latest lighting from Europe.” The downstairs rumpus room flows out to the poolside deck. Picture: supplied.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus11 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market11 hours agoSet across two levels, the home has river red gum hardwood floors with high gloss polish, high ceilings and VJ walls.A large rumpus room downstairs opens to the poolside deck. There is also a bedroom, a study, a bathroom and a laundry on this level. Internal stairs lead up to the family room and open-plan living, dining and kitchen area. The master bedroom has a dressing room and the two other bedrooms have built-in wardrobes. The family bathroom has a spa bath and separate shower and there is a sunroom opening to the front deck. The property is on the market through Cameron Reid of Crown Properties.last_img read more

Gold Coast’s most pet-friendly suburbs

first_imgThe Gold Coast’s northern suburbs are the most pet friendly.TENANTS with furry friends, rad reptiles and feathered fledglings should consider living in the Gold Coast’s northern suburbs.Latest realestate.com.au data shows landlords with rental properties in Pimpama were most accepting of animals, with 63 listings in the past year that included “pet friendly” or “pet negotiable” in their descriptions.The suburb was trailed by Hope Island with 39 listings followed closely by Arundel (28), Southport (24) and Bundall (19). MORE NEWS: Bidding war pushes property $150k past expectations Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:13Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:13 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenGet Rental Ready!01:14 There were 537 pet-friendly listings in total across the Gold Coast in the past year.Kollosche property management director Blake Farquhar said educating landlords about their rights often helped dispel fear of having pets in their properties.“I think it’s just out of fear that if something happens, they’re not protected,” he said.“In this day and age, it’s more of an education thing.” While some landlords are still reluctant, it’s becoming more common for tenants to have pets.He said people with pets would often have been knocked back when applying for rentals five years ago but it was more widely accepted today.“Pets are considered an additional family member so more and more people are becoming more accepting of it,” he said.Real Estate Institute of Queensland Gold Coast zone chairman Andrew Henderson said Pimpama was most likely a pet-friendly hot spot because it had so many rentals.“Competition is probably the main driver behind that,” he said.“There are a lot of new houses being built, a lot of those being built by investors.”Proposed rental reforms, which were announced last month, would prevent Queensland property owners from refusing pet applications unless they had sufficient grounds.Mr Henderson said it was a dangerous move considering pets could cause “considerable damage” that often far outweighed a property’s bond. “It should be an owners’ choice,” he said. Proposed rental reforms would prevent Queensland property owners from refusing pet applications.REIQ chief operating officer Josh Callaghan said it was important landlords had a choice.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa9 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day ago“Clearly there’s nothing wrong with pets, they’re important parts of family units,” he said.“We think it’s important that (landlords) at least get a say though.”He said there were pros and cons on both sides of the argument.“Often it can be a win win for a landlord to accept people with pets,” he said.“It gives you a wider choice to work out who is right for your property.“Some pets are just not appropriate for some buildings though.”Chief economist at realestate.com.au Nerida Conisbee said landlords in Melbourne were not allowed to refuse an applicant with pets and it hadn’t caused major problems.However, she said “pet friendly” was much more commonly search in Queensland.“It’s really important for people in Queensland to have their pets,” she said.center_img MORE NEWS: House back on the market a month after sellinglast_img read more

Novatek’s second-quarter profit slides

first_imgImage courtesy of NovatekRussia’s Novatek, the developer of the Yamal LNG project, reported a plunge in profit during the second quarter this year. The company’s net profit for the period reached RR 3.23 billion ($50.2 million) during the second quarter this year, dropping 92.9 percent compared to the corresponding period last year.The company’s revenue, however, dropped 5.8 percent for the quarter, reaching RR56.1 billion during the quarter significantly affected by lower average realized prices in Russian rouble terms for most of the company’s liquid hydrocarbon products as well as the decrease in liquid hydrocarbons sales volumes.Novatek’s natural gas sales volumes totaled 14.4 billion cubic meters (bcm) in the second quarter of 2017, increasing 2.3 percent over the corresponding period last year, due to the increased demand for natural gas from end-customers.As at the end of the first half 2017, the total amount of natural gas recorded as inventory totaled 0.6 bcm compared to 1.7 bcm as at the end of the first half 2016.1 RUB = 0.0167137 USDlast_img read more

Cyberthreat Is Here to Stay!

first_imgAlthough the maritime industry has long been understood as a traditional industry, it is being transformed by digitalization and connectivity. This has created opportunities for growth as maritime operations can be improved by sharing information and involving all parties in the transport chain.However, digitalization comes at a cost as everyone is exposed to the threat of a cyberattack. The shipping industry has emerged as an easy target because such attacks can affect navigation systems of vessels, cargo loading operations, services, ports and terminals, having far-reaching and damaging consequences.Julian Clark, Global Head of Shipping at Hill DickinsonWorld Maritime News spoke with Julian Clark, Global Head of Shipping at Hill Dickinson, a commercial international law firm headquartered in Liverpool, UK, in the wake of the cyberattack that shut down IT systems of Danish shipping giant Maersk, costing the company up to USD 300 million.We wanted to find out whether the recent attack is being seen as a wake-up call for shipping companies, and whether they are aware of the existing threat.“If a company as sophisticated as Maersk could be affected in such a dramatic way, requiring them to take two weeks to get all their systems back online, anyone and everyone is exposed. One of the largest issues that we have faced is the underreporting of cyber attacks. This has to change,” Clark said.WMN: As vessels have started to increasingly depend on information technology, do you think that shipping companies take cybersecurity seriously? Are they ready to invest in counterstrategies?91% of ships’ security officers said they didn’t have knowledge to deal with cyberthreatsClark: I am sure if you asked them they would say yes, especially following the recent high-profile case involving Maersk, but the reality paints a different picture. A recent survey showed that 67% of cybersecurity officers said that cybersecurity was not a serious threat to them or their vessels, 91% of ships’ security officers said that they did not have the training, knowledge or skills to deal with cyberthreats and 100% of IT heads of leading companies said that they provided no cyber training for their crews. Cost is a significant factor but the time has come where there needs to be a significant investment.WMN: How does the maritime sector compare to other sectors in terms of cybersecurity? Is there any market segment (container shipping, LNG, offshore) particularly vulnerable to cyberattacks?Clark: Other industry sectors are certainly further down the line and the maritime industry generally is behind the curve, although that is changing. I think sometimes there has been an attitude of, “it can’t happen to us” not least due to a false belief that it was hard to infiltrate vessel systems and that access points were limited.However, the list of access points is pretty endless with exposure to communication systems, bridge systems, AIS, ECDIS, proportion and machinery management, emissions and ballast controls, smart containers and crew welfare systems. There is no particular sector of the industry that is more exposed than any other. It’s the systems and access points that create the issues.WMN: Who should play a key role in recognizing and combating cyberthreats in the sector, industry bodies or? Clark: It is a risk faced by the whole sector universally and a strategic and coordinated response is what is required. This risk is a real game changer and neither standard insurance coverage nor legal precedent has developed to assess and deal with the risks involved. Sooner or later there will be an incident which will eclipse the Maersk case. I only hope that far in advance of that, all of those involved in the sector will have actively cooperated to be ready for and know how to address both the risk and consequences.WMN: How do you comment on the IMO’s recently adopted Resolution on Maritime Cyber Risk Management in Safety Management Systems as well as Guidelines on Maritime Cyber Risk Management?Clark: Both this and the recent BIMCO guidelines are welcome developments. It is essential that we develop systems and drills to attend to the risk. Companies need to buy in at board level and top management leadership while at the same time ensuring that the entire personnel chain is aware of the issues. The guidelines and upcoming implementation into ISM will help to create real focus and attention as well as a true risk-based approach to the issues.WMN: Do you see the necessity to include a cyber clause as “force majeure” in marine insurance contracts? Is it possible to do so, taking into account that nobody knows the extent and the consequences of a potential attack?Clark: An incredible amount of work needs to be done on all forms of maritime contracts. While insurance coverage generally excludes cyber risk, issues arise as to whether the standard exclusions address the modern risk.For example, several exclusions require an intent to harm and the effect of a computer virus and yet we have seen significant incidents where there has not been a clear intent to harm but an infiltration which would be better described as a “prank” -albeit one with serious consequences.Also, the use of ransom and malware does not properly fall within the definition of a computer virus. It certainly doesn’t cover the risk and loss attached to phishing, sms phishing and social media attacks. Very recently a senior insurance executive commented that the coverage available needed to be raised by 10 times the current levels available.Returning to the legal sector, there is a real risk that deficiencies in anti-viral software and security systems could render a ship unseaworthy. Currently, maritime contracts simply do not address the myriad of issues with any real degree of clarity or certainty.WMN: Could cyberattacks become a new trend adopted by pirates – hackers getting access to a vessel’s itinerary, choosing vessels with the most valuable cargo when planning the attack? Could we see more collisions or even ships being sunk as a result of cyberattacks especially with the imminent introduction of autonomous ships?Clark: Absolutely. We have already seen incidents of pirates accessing manifests in order to target high-value cargo. There has also been commentary suggesting that pirates were able to access the schematics of citadel construction in order to defeat this form of antipiracy measure.The possibility to imitate AIS and GPS data is real and examples have been provided to show how an ECDIS system can be hacked which could easily result in a significant collision, grounding or another major incident.The potential for cyberterrorism at sea is simply terrifying. The risk will increase with the introduction of autonomous shipping, albeit one hopes that such ships will have the most sophisticated and up-to-date protections in place. However, the risk also exists at a much more down-to-earth level – imagine how a disgruntled seafarer may now seek to take action against an ex-employer before he leaves his final ship?WMN: How do we resolve the issue of accountability seeing that it is very difficult to trace the culprits for such attacks?Clark: In the same way that we saw a coordinated international response to the issues and danger to shipping as a result of the increase in piracy activity in the Gulf of Aden, we need a similar coordinated international response to cyber risk. Only with a legal framework that is internationally recognized and enforced will we properly be able to police this particular risk. It will be essential to bring on board those industry sectors which are at the forefront of IT and AI technology and development.WMN: In conclusion, which direction do you see this issue taking when it comes to the maritime sector?Clark: Greater focus, increased risk, further high-profile incidents, industry reaction. It is inconceivable that this issue will go away. The development of technology and particularly AI is now occurring at such a rate that it is constantly outpacing the hitherto protections which would have been put in place and tested well in advance. The sector, including the operators, traders, legal and insurance professionals, are all playing catch up. The engagement of expert maritime cyber professionals is an excellent development but the pool of talent is extremely restricted.The excellent progress made by the IMO and BIMCO is a welcome start but what is now required is across the board industry buy-in, together with the development and implementation of maritime documentation (both legal and insurance) which properly addresses cyber risk. We can expect to see experts in the field being retained on a regular basis in order to carry out proper emergency drills and risk assessments across all aspects of the operation both sea and shore-based.World Maritime News Staff; Image Courtesy: Hill Dickinsonlast_img read more

KNOT Offshore Partners Takes Brasil Knutsen

first_imgKNOT Offshore Partners’ subsidiary KNOT Shuttle Tankers has acquired KNOT Shuttle Tankers 32, a company that owns and operates the shuttle tanker Brasil Knutsen.As informed, the 153,684 dwt ship was bought from Knutsen NYK Offshore Tankers for an aggregate price of USD 96 million, less USD 59 million of outstanding indebtedness under the secured credit facility related to the vessel, less approximately USD 35.2 million for a loan owed by KNOT 32 to Knutsen NYK, plus certain capitalized fees related to the financing of the Brasil Knutsen.Upon closing of the acquisition, KNOT 32 repaid the company liquidity loan in full, the company said.The purchase price was settled by way of a cash payment of approximately USD 3.1 million and will be subject to certain post-closing adjustments for working capital and interest and currency fluctuation on the company liquidity loan. The Brasil Facility is repayable in quarterly installments with a final balloon payment of USD 41 million due at maturity in July 2022 and bears interest at an annual rate equal to LIBOR plus a margin of 2.3%, according to KNOT Offshore Partners.Built at Samsung Heavy Industries shipyard in Korea in 2013, the DP2 Suezmax class shuttle tanker is operating in Brazil under a time charter with Galp Sinopec Brazil Services B.V., which will expire in the third quarter of 2022. The charterer has options to extend the charter for two three-year periods.Brasil Knutsen, previously named Brasil Voyager, was purchased by Knutsen NYK Offshore Tankers for USD 90 million in May this year, VesselsValue’s data shows.KNOT Offshore Partners owns, operates and acquires shuttle tankers under long-term charters in the deep-water offshore oil production regions of the North Sea and Brazil.last_img read more

Pipeline blockage closes down Erskine production

first_imgChevron-operated Erskine field in the UK North Sea is currently unable to produce due to an issue with a pipeline.The Erskine Field lies approximately 150 miles (241 km) east of Aberdeen, in water depths of about 296 feet (90 m). It is operated by Chevron (50 percent) with Chrysaor (32 percent) and Serica Energy (18 percent) holding non-operated interests in the field.Serica Energy informed on Monday that during routine pipeline cleaning operations of the Lomond to Everest condensate export pipeline, a blockage occurred in the pipeline.The cause is currently being investigated and, during this period, the Erskine field will be unable to produce, Serica added in a brief statement on Monday.Discovered in 1981 in Block 23/26, Erskine is a gas condensate field. It was the first high-pressure, high-temperature field to be developed in the U.K. Continental Shelf. First production was achieved in November 1997.The field includes a normally unattended installation and is remotely controlled from Chrysaor’s Lomond platform. An 18.6 mile (30 km) pipeline links the two facilities.Processing takes place in a dedicated module on the Lomond platform. Gas and condensate are exported separately to Chrysaor’s North Everest platforms before gas is finally exported via the Central Area Transmission System and condensate is exported through the Forties Pipeline System.To remind, it has been less that a month since Erskine restarted production following a controlled shutdown in December due to a hairline crack at the onshore section of the Ineos-operated Forties pipeline.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

Providence Adds Senior Independent Director

first_imgProvidence Resources, the Irish based oil & gas exploration company, has appointed Dr Angus McCoss as senior independent director with immediate effect.  Dr McCoss joined the Providence board as a non-executive director in June 2017.Pat Plunkett, chairman of Providence Resources said: “We are delighted that Angus is taking on the role of senior independent director and are confident that he will bring the same wealth of experience to this position as he has provided to the board since joining in 2017.”Dr Angus McCoss is the exploration director and a main board director of Tullow Oil and is a non-executive director of Ikon Science.cDr McCoss joined Tullow in 2006 following 21 years of wide-ranging exploration experience, working primarily with Shell in Africa, Europe, China, South America and the Middle East.He held a number of senior positions at Shell, including regional vice president of Exploration for the Americas and general manager of Exploration in Nigeria.Dr McCoss holds a PhD in Structural Geology and is a member of the advisory board of the industry-backed Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah.last_img read more

ADS Crude Carriers to Pay More for Scrubber Installations

first_imgTanker owner and operator ADS Crude Carriers has seen an increase in the cost of its scrubber installation project in China.The VLCC owner said that the total expected investment in scrubber systems and taking the vessels through intermediate surveys is around USD 6.5 million per vessel, up from the previously guided USD 5.5 million per vessel.The company, set up in April 2018, explained that the change was mainly due to “increased estimated costs necessary to maintain the highest level vessel rating.”Subsequent to quarter end, two of the company’s vessels went into yard to perform mandatory intermediate surveys and retrofitting of scrubbers, with the third vessel expected to enter yard around the end of September. ADS Crude Carriers said that the yard stays remain on schedule with two expected to finish before end of the third quarter of 2019 and one during the fourth quarter of the year.The rise in costs was revealed as part of the company’s second quarter of 2019 financial report.ADS Crude Carriers reported a net profit of USD 0.6 million for the second quarter of 2019, down from a profit of USD 1.2 million seen in the first quarter of the year. Net revenue decreased 27% to USD 4.8 million from USD 6.5 million in the previous quarter, mainly due to increased voyage expenses.“The seasonally weak tanker market impacted our second quarter earnings, resulting in a 27% lower average Time Charter Equivalent quarter-on-quarter of USD 17,463 per day and providing a net profit of USD 0.6 million, of which we will immediately return USD 0.5 million back to shareholders by way of a dividend,” Bjørn Tore Larsen, Chairman of the Board of Directors, said.last_img read more