Finn Valley Centre to host health and wellbeing event

first_imgA Health and Wellbeing Event is being held on the evening on Thursday June 29th from 7.00 – 10.00 in the Finn Valley Centre, Stranorlar.It is a FREE event open to everyone of all ages that aims to showcase what is available in our local community to promote a healthy lifestyle.Get a free health check, dental advice, sample some alternative therapies, enjoy some healthy food tastings, find out about community activities or take part in some fitness demos and advice. The event is being organized by the Finn Valley Community Health Forum in association with the Finn Valley Centre.Finn Valley Centre to host health and wellbeing event was last modified: June 21st, 2017 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:finn valleyhealth and wellbeingStranorlarlast_img read more

PICTURE SPECIAL: PROFESSIONAL CYCLIST PHILLIP DEIGNAN VISITS COPE CYCLES IN DUNGLOE

first_imgPhilip Deignan on his visit recent to Cope Cycles with the Errigal YouthsPhilip Deignan with the statue of the founder of The Cope – Paddy The Cope GallagherPhilip Deignan cycles down Dungloe Main StreetPhilip Deignan – Team Sky Cyclist viisting Cope Cycles Dungloe recentlyLetterkenny native Philip Deignan, who is a Professional Cyclist for Team Sky, recently visited Cope Cycles in Dungloe to meet with cyclists, both young and old to share advice on cycling and take part in leisure cycle.Deignan is the first Irishman to ride in Team Sky colours and is now into his 10th year as a pro.With six Grand Tour appearances to his name – including a stage victory and top-10 overall finish at the 2009 Vuelta a Espana. 2013 saw Philip excel on American soil, collecting a string of top results at the Tours of the Gila, California, Utah, and the USA Pro Challenge.In 2014 Philip was 42nd overall in the Giro D’Italia.Philip is keen to encourage young riders to develop their cycling talents and show them that with hard work and determination you can achieve your dreams.Philip visited Cope Cycles on July 4th and had a meet & greet session with both young and old to talk about cycling and youth development. Philip then very graciously took part in a leisure cycle with all who had turned out to meet him.Around the scenic roads of the Rosses, Philip rode with many junior cyclists, offering advice and encouragement to them, with many “older” cyclists looking for advice too!Hopefully Donegal will produce many more cyclists of Philip’s calibre in years to come!  PICTURE SPECIAL: PROFESSIONAL CYCLIST PHILLIP DEIGNAN VISITS COPE CYCLES IN DUNGLOE was last modified: July 16th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CYCLISTFeaturesnewsPhillip DeignanSportTeam SkyTHE COPElast_img read more

Olympics boss Hickey to face trial but it could take a year

first_imgA judge in Rio de Janeiro has accepted charges against Irish Olympic boss Pat Hickey and Kevin Mallon. In her decision, Judge Juliana Leal de Melo, from the Special Court for Supporters and Large Events accepted charges, which were forwarded by public prosecutor Marcus Kac on Tuesday.The ten defendants are charged with criminal organisation; ticket touting, ambush marketing, larceny, money laundering, and tax evasion. Also charged with Mr Hickey and Mr Mallon are co-defendants Marcus Paul Evans, Michael Glynn, Ken Murray, Eamonn Collins, Maarten Van Os, David Patrick Gilmore, Martin Studd, and Barbara Zancope Carnieri.RTE reports the judge ordered that the passports of Mr Hickey and Mr Mallon be retained, and both be impeded from leaving Brazil, for the forseeable future.It is expected that it could be around one and a half years before a court case in Rio de Janeiro reaches fruition.Sources have suggested that the passports of the two Irish men could be returned in this interim, but any such decision rests with the Brazilian judiciary. Olympics boss Hickey to face trial but it could take a year was last modified: September 9th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

France v Belgium: World Cup 2018 preview, predicted line-ups, plus more

first_imgSomehow we’re already into the World Cup semi-finals and tonight you can hear France vs Belgium live on talkSPORT.The European neighbours must go head-to-head in Saint Petersburg as they bid to reach the final of the tournament on Saturday. France star Hugo Lloris made a vital save to keep Uruguay at bay in the quarter-finals. Belgium players celebrate during their victory over Brazil in the World Cup quarter-finals. 6 Kevin De Bruyne (Belgium): “I said before the tournament that we were coming here to win it. It was not with arrogance that I said that back then.“I think Belgium has a good team and plenty of other teams came here wanting to win the competition.“You have to show ambition otherwise you can’t win. That’s the attitude we are going into the match with.” France manager Didier Deschamps captained his nation to glory as a player in 1998. It promises to be a real treat for fans and neutrals with both sides possessing lethal attacks, and solid defences.But something has got to give at this stage of the World Cup and you can hear what promises to be an exciting encounter live on talkSPORT at 7pm.What the managers are sayingDidier Deschamps (France): “The potential is there, the individual quality is there, this side is younger than the side that was in the final of Euro 2016 but they have a lot of club experience at a high level.“We will be more competitive. In two and four years, we have a lot of players who will still be here with us. There is potential for progression and this experience here should help them.” Predicted teamsFrance: Hugo Lloris; Lucas Hernandez, Samuel Umtiti, Raphael Varane, Benjamin Pavard; N’Golo Kante, Paul Pogba; Blaise Matuidi, Antoine Griezmann, Kylian Mbappe; Olivier Giroud.Belgium: Thibaut Courtois; Jan Vertonghen, Vincent Kompany, Toby Alderweireld; Yannick Carrasco, Axel Witsel, Kevin De Bruyne, Nacer Chadli; Dries Mertens, Eden Hazard; Romelu Lukaku​.You can listen to France vs Belgium live on talkSPORT tonight from 7pm. 6 6 Belgium head coach Roberto Martinez impressed with his tactical switch against Brazil. Roberto Martinez (Belgium): “It’s been two years to try and understand these footballers, the human beings behind the footballers, and to try and get a group that shared the same ambition, not just to use the national team to improve their brand.“We’ve strived to be as good as we could be at international level and it’s taken us two years to get there. But there haven’t been one or two secrets to make it work, it’s been common sense.“It’s a group of people who share a vision of making Belgian football proud and achieving something important and these players have done that.” What the players are sayingHugo Lloris (France): “They are an exhaustive team, they know how to do everything.“I think the Belgian team is the most exhaustive team in all aspects of the game during this tournament – they are strong everywhere.“They have everything they need to be a great team and they are a great team. It is a fantastic generation and in order to beat them we will have to play a great match.“We know there are going to be difficult moments and we’ll have to be ready to suffer.“But we will be ready because we have an extremely good state of mind and it is the semi-finals in the World Cup. It is an opportunity in our careers and we have to grab it with both hands.” 6 Manchester City star Kevin De Bruyne was in brilliant form in a freer role against Brazil, scoring their second goal of the game. 6 6 Belgium right wing-back Thomas Meunier will miss the semi-final through suspension. How can I listen?Click here to listen to our live commentary of the action as it happens on talkSPORT.Team newsBlaise Matuidi returns from suspension for France and is likely to start in place of Corentin Tolisso, while Olivier Giroud will continue up top.For the Belgians, Roberto Martinez is likely to return to his favoured 3-4-2-1 but right wing-back Thomas Meunier’s suspension means a reshuffle is needed and could lead to several alterations, with either Nacer Chadli replacing him, or Martinez keeping the 4-3-2-1 which worked so well against Brazil.last_img read more

South African literature

first_imgAn overview of the main currents in South African literature, from Olive Schreiner’s depiction of life on isolated Karoo farms to more recent work that tackles the aftermath of apartheid and pushes into the post-apartheid future.South Africa has a rich and diverse literary history. (Image: Okay Africa)Brand South Africa reporterSouth Africa has a rich and diverse literary history, with realism, until relatively recently, dominating works of fiction.Fiction has been written in all of South Africa’s 11 official languages – with a large body of work in Afrikaans and English. This overview focuses primarily on English fiction, though it also touches on major poetic developments.Sections in this article:The colonial adventureTruly South African voices Emergence of black writing Between the wars The 1940sThe Drum decade: urban black life Gordimer: liberalism to radicalismFigures of the 1960s The Soweto poetsThe emergency years After apartheidThe colonial adventure The first fictional works to emerge from South Africa were produced by colonial writers whose attitude to indigenous South Africans was, at best, ambivalent, if not outright hostile. This is especially true of the writers of adventure-type stories, in which colonial heroes are romanticised and the role of black South Africans was reduced to that of enemy or servant.One such writer, Rider Haggard, wrote many mythical and adventure stories, beginning in the early 1880s. His most famous book is King Solomon’s Mines (1886), a bestseller in its day (and filmed several times up to the 1980s). Like subsequent novels such as Allan Quartermain and She (both 1887), its central character is the hunter Allan Quartermain, Haggard’s ideal of the colonial gentleman.Although Haggard wrote many other adventures and fantasies, it is his highly coloured African works that are still read today.Back to topTruly South African voices Olive Schreiner’s novel, The Story of an African Farm (1883) is generally considered to be the founding text of South African literature. Schreiner was born on a mission station and worked as a governess on isolated Karoo farms, an experience that informed the novel.The novel draws on the post-romantic sensibility of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, and is still a key text in the formation of a truly South African voice. However, it has been criticised for its silence with regard to the black African presence in South Africa. Schreiner’s other work includes a critique of Cecil John Rhodes’s brutal form of colonialism, Trooper Peter Halkett of Mashonaland (1897), and the polemical Women and Labour (1911).Douglas Blackburn, a maverick British journalist who came to South Africa when the Transvaal was still a Boer republic, had something in common with Schreiner. In several newspapers, he denounced British colonial attitudes as well as satirising Boer corruption. He wrote two novels set in this world, Prinsloo of Prinsloosdorp (1899) and A Burgher Quixote (1903), capturing with a great deal of sly humour the personality and situation of the Boer at the time. His later novel Leaven (1908) is a moving denunciation of “blackbirding” (the recruitment of people through trickery and kidnappings to work on farms) and other iniquitous labour practices, and Love Muti (1915) attacks British colonial attitudes.Emergence of black writing Literature by black South Africans emerged in the 20 th century. The first generation of mission-educated African writers sought to restore dignity to Africans by invoking and reconstructing a heroic African past.The first novel by a black South African was Mhudi (completed in 1920 but only published in 1930), by Solomon (Sol) Thekiso Plaatje. This epic story follows the trajectory of the Tswana people during and after their military encounter with the Zulus under Shaka, the Zulu conqueror of the 19th century, and encompasses their earliest encounters with the white people moving into the interior.Viewed as the founding father of black literature in South Africa, Plaatje was also the first secretary general of the then South African Native National Congress (now the African National Congress) at its foundation in 1912. His Native Life in South Africa (1916) was a seminal text in the study of land dispossession in South Africa. He also wrote a diary of the siege of Mafeking during the Boer War, and translated Shakespeare into seTswana language.While Plaatje’s Mhudi related the history of the Tswana people in South African literature, Thomas Mofolo’s Chaka reinvents the legendary Zulu king, Shaka. Mofolo portrays him as a heroic but tragic figure, a monarch to rival Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Mofolo, however, also invests Shaka with a complex personality, in which good and evil are at war – in contrast to white colonial historians who made him a simplistic monster of tribal savagery. Completed in 1910, the novel was published in 1925 and the first English translation came out in 1930.Between the wars Perhaps the dominant figure of South African literature in the period between the two world wars was Sarah Gertrude Millin, whose reputation has faded considerably since her death. This can be predicated on her politics: she was initially a devout supporter of Jan Smuts’ government, but later became something of an apologist for apartheid.Her views on the “tragedy” of racial miscegenation were put forward in God’s Stepchildren (1924). Seen in terms of racial hierarchies, with whites at the top and blacks at the bottom, Millin’s views represented those held widely at the time.Her later novels continued to deal with the predicament of coloured (mixed-race) people in South Africa, or attempted to describe the world of indigenous peoples.Back to topThe 1940s The 1940s saw the beginnings of a flowering of literature by black South Africans such as HIE Dhlomo whose work preached a “return to the source” – the wisdom of finding traditional ways of dealing with modern problems. His work includes several plays and the long poem The Valley of a Thousand Hills (1941). Poets such as BW Vilakazi, who wrote in Zulu, gave new literary life to their indigenous languages.Peter Abrahams, a writer of mixed race descent, published his first novel Mine Boy in 1946, the same year a large miners’ strike was violently suppressed by Smuts’ government. Mine Boy depicts life in black urban areas of the time, and dramatises the problems of rural people in a depressed urban environment – a theme that was referred to as the “Jim comes to Jo’burg” phenomenon in South African literature.Later works by Abrahams (who left South Africa and settled in Britain before finally moving to Jamaica) include The Path of Thunder (1948), which deals with interracial love; Return to Goli (1953), about his journey back to report on life in Johannesburg; and his autobiography Tell Freedom (1954).Another South African writer who emerged in the 1940s, Herman Charles Bosman, is best known for his tales, a portrait of Afrikaner storytelling skills and social attitudes. The first collection of stories was published in Mafeking Road in 1947. Among the most famous are Unto Dust and In the Withaak’s Shade. Bosman, who was once jailed for the mysterious murder of his half-brother, also wrote poetry, novels, and much journalism, often satirical. One of his best works, Cold Stone Jug (1949), is a semi-fictionalised account of his time in jail. All his books have been reissued in new 2001 editions to coincide with the 50th anniversary of his death.Bosman had satirised social attitudes in South Africa, but it was the work of a former white schoolteacher, Alan Paton, that brought the world’s attention to the situation of black people in South Africa. Cry, The Beloved Country (1948) is possibly the most famous novel to have come out of South Africa. When it was first published, it was an international bestseller, launching Paton, to worldwide fame. The novel put South Africa on the map of international politics by making visible to Western audiences the effects of racial prejudice and the oppression of black people. The novel was turned into a movie in 1995.It is the story of a black priest who travels to Johannesburg in search of his son, who had fallen victim to the corrupting influence of the city. The novel explores themes of corruption and forgiveness, putting forward a liberal-humanist view of South Africa’s racial politics – as well as Paton’s deeply felt Christianity. The novel has a lovely poetic language, with extensive use of Biblical cadences, though Paton has also been criticised for a possibly condescending portrayal of black people.Back to topThe Drum decade: urban black life The 1950s also saw a new generation of black writers talking about the conditions of their lives in their own voices – voices with a distinctive stamp and style. The popular Drum magazine in the 1950s was their forum, and encouraged their emergence. It depicted a vibrant urban black culture for the first time – a world of jazz, shebeens (illegal drinking dens), and flamboyant gangsters (tsotsis).These Drum writers, whose style will be later described by renowned writer Es’kia Mphahlele as “racy, agitated, impressionistic, it quivered with a nervous energy, a caustic wit”, depicted urban deprivation, and also the resilience of people who survived “without visible means of subsistence”. They recorded satirical stories ridiculing the discriminatory and repressive policies of the state, while others provided harrowing details of the effect of apartheid legislation on people’s lives.Their work ranged from the investigative journalism of Henry Nxumalo to the witty social commentary of Todd Matshikiza; others such as Nat Nakasa, Can Themba and Mphahlele moved toward embodying their visions of black South African life in poetry or fiction.Later, Nakasa edited a literary journal, The Classic, that published work such as Themba’s story “The Suit” (1963), now regarded as a classic of South African literature. Themba was banned by the apartheid state and died in 1968 in exile, but others such as Mphahlele pursued their literary careers.Lewis Nkosi became a noted literary critic in Europe and the United States. Other notable writers connected in some way to Drum include William Bloke Modisane, Arthur Maimane, Dyke Sentso, James Matthews, Peter Clarke, Richard Rive, Jordan Ngubane, Alex La Guma and Casey Motsisi. Modisane wrote the autobiography Blame Me on History (1963), Matthews has written much poetry and a novel, and Rive wrote Buckingham Palace, District Six (1986), about life in that coloured Cape Town area, and two novels about South African states of emergency, decades apart, Emergency (1964) and Emergency Continued (1989).The Drum Decade , edited by Michael Chapman, and A Good Looking Corpse , by Mike Nicol, anthologise and comment on key works of this era.Professor E’skia Mphahlele’s autobiographical Down Second Avenue (1959) is a landmark in the development of South African fiction. Set in a village and a township near Pretoria, the text records in evocative language the resilience of various female characters in Mphahlele’s life, women who defied poverty and urban squalor to bring him up. At the same time, they are presented with complexity and depth – his grandmother, for one, is a rather tyrannical figure.Mphahlele went on to write critiques The African Image (1962), short stories Man Must Live (1946), In Corner B (1967), as well as further novels, including The Wanderers (1971), in some ways an extension of the autobiographical form of Down Second Avenue . He also wrote poetry and autobiography. Taken as a whole, Mphahlele’s oeuvre represents one of the most important views of the life experience and developing views of a politically aware South African.In 2007, actor and theatre director James Ngcobo reworked Mphahlele’s poignant and emotional story The Suitcase into a highly successful play.Back to topGordimer: liberalism to radicalism At the same time as the Drum generation was creating the first urban black voice, one of South Africa’s most important white writers was beginning her long, distinguished career. Nadine Gordimer published her first short stories in the early 1950s and in 1991 she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Between those two dates, her many novels and short stories articulated key issues for white South Africans sympathetic to the plight of disenfranchised blacks, as well as providing for the outside world a devastating picture of what it was like to live under apartheid.In her first published novel The Lying Days (1953), Gordimer charts the growing political awareness of a young white woman, Helen, towards small-town life and South African racial divisionHer second novel, A World of Strangers (1958), shows the first fruitful but often frightening encounters between white and black people in the heady days of Sophiatown. By the time of The Late Bourgeois World (1966), Gordimer is dealing directly with the effects of the black liberation movement on white South Africans, showing the divided soul of the white liberal in a morally ambivalent situation. The Conservationist (1974) pits Afrikaner land hunger against the indigenous population in an often phantasmagoric narrative. Burger’s Daughter (1979) depicts the involvement of radical white activists in the liberation struggle. July’s People (1981), perhaps Gordimer’s most powerful novel, projects into the future the final collapse of white supremacy and what that might mean for white and black people on an intimate level. Her other works (and her short stories are regarded as among her finest work) deal with issues such as love across the colour line and, more recently, the emergence of South Africa into a democracy after the release of Nelson Mandela in 1990 – a society still dealing with a myriad contradictions.Back to topFigures of the 1960s In the early 1960s, the State of Emergency used by the apartheid state to crack down on dissidents and the banning of political organisations sent many black writers into exile. Among them was Alex la Guma, a Marxist and ANC leader who saw the purpose of his work as the exposure of the dreadful conditions of South Africa’s oppressed.His novella A Walk in the Night (1962) shows the life of crime to which slum inhabitants are driven, and And a Threefold Cord (1967) contrasts the existence of a black worker in a white home with her employers’ affluent life. The later novel, In the Fog of the Season’s End (1972), possibly his best, shows the developing consciousness of a man dedicated to the underground struggle for freedom. As a “listed person”, little of La Guma’s work was available in South Africa until 1990, when the liberation movements were unbanned.At the same time, in the 1960s, the Afrikaans literary scene had a rush of new blood, as literary writers such as Jan Rabie, Etienne Leroux, Breyten Breytenbach and Andre Brink emerged. Publishing first in Afrikaans, these writers were increasingly politicised by the situation in South Africa and their contrasting experiences overseas.Breytenbach, who began as one of the most linguistically radical new poets in Afrikaans, left South Africa for France in 1960, where he became a vocal critic of the apartheid state. Later, in the 1970s, he returned to South Africa and was arrested and jailed for work he was doing for the liberation movement. From this experience came his extraordinary prison memoir, True Confessions of an Albino Terrorist (1996). His prison poetry was published in English in Judas Eye (1988). Breytenbach’s return visits to South Africa are recorded, mixing reportage and imaginative commentary, in A Season in Paradise (1976) and Return to Paradise (1993). His essays have been published in The Memory of Birds in Times of Revolution (1996). Even under an ANC government as he was under a Nationalist one, Breytenbach remains caustic about politics and power.Andre Brink stayed in South Africa to see his novels become the first Afrikaans works banned by the government. Written in English as well as Afrikaans, his novels have become as important a part of South African English-language literature as they are in Afrikaans. Having published several novels in Afrikaans during the 1960s, it was his novel Looking on Darkness (1973) that was first banned.His immensely powerful novel A Dry White Season (1982), focused on the death in detention of a black activist, and caused great irritation to the apartheid state, while conscientising many white South Africans. It was also banned, then unbanned. Later novels by this prolific novelist include An Act of Terror (1991), dealing with an Afrikaner dissident turned “terrorist”, and On the Contrary (1993), a playful reworking of South Africa’s colonial history.During this period, Bessie Head emerged as a leading South African woman writer. Of mixed blood, and with a traumatic family history, Head left South Africa to avoid its racial policies and lived in Botswana, where she felt more at ease. Her novels show a marked sympathy with ordinary peasant women; her heroines are poor but strong-willed, women who have to face up to various forms of prejudice.Her first novel was When Rain Clouds Gather (1968), followed by Maru (1971), The Collector of Treasures (1977), and A Question of Power (1973). The Collector of Treasures is her most autobiographical work, dealing with the traumas of her own illegitimate mixed-race birth, her mother’s suicide and her own nervous breakdown.Another writer to make his name in the 1960s was Wilbur Smith, South Africa’s a worldwide best-selling author. In many ways he is the heir to the tradition of Rider Haggard – some would say politically as well.His earliest novels are probably his best: Where the Lion Feeds (1964) and The Sound of Thunder (1966) are set in the era of the foundation of gold-mining in South Africa. Others go as far afield as the state of Israel, Ethiopia during the Italian invasion, piracy in the age of sail, or, more recently, investigate the pharaonic times of Ancient Egypt. His latest novel, The Quest (2007), is New York Times’s best seller as well as best seller in several European countries.The 1960s also saw the emergence of a new generation of white South African poets, among them Douglas Livingstone, Sidney Clouts, Ruth Miller, Lionel Abrahams and Stephen Gray. Their work ranges from powerful apprehensions of natural life (Livingstone) to more interior, meditative considerations (Abrahams), and a sardonic socio-political sensibility (Gray).Gray has also written novels, plays and much criticism. Abrahams has written two semi-autobiographical novels, The Celibacy of Felix Greenspan (1977) and The White Life of Felix Greenspan (2002).Back to topThe Soweto poets The 1970s are widely regarded as a defining period for the development of political consciousness among black South Africans. With the rise of the Black Consciousness (BC) movement, of which the martyred Bantu Steve Biko was a leading figure, and the school children’s revolt of 1976, literature became a vehicle to promote the political ideals of anti-apartheid popular movements. The genres of drama and poetry were utilised for their immediacy of impact.The most notable writers from this period are Mongane (Wally) Serote, Sipho Sepamla, Oswald Joseph Mbuyiseni Mtshali, Christopher van Wyk, Mafika Gwala and Don Mattera. Couched in graphic language designed to arouse the emotions of listeners, their poems were often performed at political rallies.While Mtshali’s poems, first published in 1971 in The Sound of a Cowhide Drum , asked for generalised sympathy for the plight of poor black people, and Sepamla was at first considered a “contemplative” poet, the tone soon changed. By the time of The Soweto I Love (1977), Sepamla’s poetic persona is fully identified with the oppressed. Sepamla also wrote a novel of this turbulent time, A Ride on the Whirlwind (1981). Sepamla, apart from being a leading arts teacher, has written several other novels, and his Selected Poems were published in 1984.Serote’s early poems, in volumes such as Yakhal’inkomo (1972) and Tsetlo (1974), deal with the life and attitudes of a politically aware black person, looking at his society and its discontentment. In later volumes, Serote begins to develop an epic, incantatory voice, with the long poems of Behold Mama, Flowers (1978) and Come and Hope with Me (1994), winner of the Noma Award for Publishing in Africa.Serote (who became an ANC leader) is also the author of the novel To Every Birth Its Blood (1981), a remarkable account of political activity in the 1970s. Serote’s later novel, Gods of our Time (1999), reconstructs civil and military campaigns which led to the demise of apartheid.Other interesting fiction to deal with the Soweto revolt and subsequent political activity include Miriam Tlali’s Amandla (1980) and Mbulelo Mzamane’s The Children of Soweto (1982). Don Mattera has written an account of life in Sophiatown, and its destruction, Memory is the Weapon (1987).The emergency years A mass democratic movement, based on the ideals of the Freedom Charter, arose within the country in the 1980s and the state responded with successive states of emergency that brought white troops to the townships.In the face of this, poets such as the orator Mzwakhe Mbuli reached vast audiences, while novelists such as Menan du Plessis and Mandla Langa engaged with the business of resistance to apartheid.Yet, at the same time, some felt the need for a move away from rhetoric and toward the depiction of ordinary life and Njabulo Ndebele, in his 1986 essay, The Rediscovery of the Ordinary expressed this view, seeing politically determined work as inimical to a full depiction of rounded humanity in fiction. His own fiction, in the award-winning collection, Fools and Other Stories (1983), demonstrated that it could be done with grace. The main story, Fools was later reworked into a movie with an all-South African cast.Like Ndebele, JM Coetzee, one of South Africa’s most lauded writers in the 1970s, dealt in subtle ways with issues of power, authority and history. One of the key works of recent South African writing, Coetzee’s novel Waiting for the Barbarians (1980) tackles issues germane to South Africa. His next novel, Life and Times of Michael K (1983), a story of a poor man of colour trying to survive in a civil-war situation, won the Booker Prize in Britain. Age of Iron (1990) takes the perspective of a white academic who is dying even as the townships explode with violence.Coetzee’s next novel, Disgrace (1999), won him a second Booker Prize and caused huge debate in South Africa over its depiction of a post-apartheid reality in which the wounds of the past have not been healed – and new ones are being inflicted. A film of the book, starring John Malkovitch, had its world premier at the Toronto Film Festival in 2008, where it won the International Critics’ Award.An illustrious literary academic, Coetzee published Doubling the Point (1992), and has published a memoir of growing up in South Africa, Boyhood (1998).His more recent works include The Lives of Animals , edited and introduced by Amy Gutmann (1999); The Humanities in Africa – Die Geisteswissenschaften in Afrika (2001); Stranger Shores: Essays, 1986 to 1999 (2001); and two more novels, Youth (2002) and Slow Man (2005).Coetzee was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2003 and the Order of Mapungubwe by the South African government on 27 September 2005 for his “exceptional contribution in the field of literature and for putting South Africa on the world stage.”Back to topAfter apartheid The most prominent question asked of South African writers after the end of apartheid and the release of Nelson Mandela in 1990 was: what will you write about since the primary topic has gone?Well, apartheid may have died, but its effects linger on, and as writers such as Coetzee have demonstrated, the issues of power that haunted the apartheid era are still in many ways with us. The early years of democracy were characterized by a new form of writing which literary critic Stephane Serge Ibinga describes as ‘honeymoon literature’ or ‘the literature of celebration’.One of the most acclaimed of these post-democracy writers is Zakes Mda, who worked for many years as a playwright and poet before publishing his first novels in 1995. He started with two novels, She Plays with the Darkness and Ways of Dying . The latter, the story of a professional mourner, won the M-Net Book Prize. His next novel, The Heart of Redness (2001), won the Commonwealth Prize; it contrasts the past of the 19th century, when the prophetess Nongqawuse brought ruin to the Xhosa people, with a present-day narrative.Ivan Vladislavic is another author pushing into the post-apartheid future, with distinctly post-modern works that play with the conventions of fiction as much as they speak about contemporary realties in South Africa today. He has published two collections of stories, Missing Persons (1990) and Propaganda by Monuments (2000), and two novels, The Folly (1993) and The Restless Supermarket (2001).One of the most irreverent voices to hit the South African literary scene over the past decade is poet Lesego Rampolokeng. His poems are published in Horns for Hondo (1991) and End Beginnings (1993). A powerful live performer of his work, he has collaborated with musicians as well.K Sello Duiker is a young novelist who has recently made a splash in South Africa with two novels that have won him awards and critical acclaim, Thirteen Cents (2000) and The Quiet Violence of Dreams (2001). Set in the urban landscape of Cape Town, the two novels see the world through the eyes of the underdog, a street kid in the first and an ostracised gay student in the second.Mark Behr has been one of the most compelling and controversial additions to the South African literary canon. His first novel, The Smell of Apples (1997), tells of white South Africans who were brainwashed by the apartheid system. Soon after that, Behr admitted that he had been a spy for the apartheid police while a student activist; a graphic illustration, if one were needed, of the divided loyalties felt by many whites in that period. Behr’s second novel, Embrace (2000), deals with the formative experiences of a young homosexual.There are many South African writers still dealing with the legacy of apartheid and the struggle against it, as South Africa finds a new national – and hybrid – identity. One is Zoe Wicomb, whose new novel, David’s Story (2001, winner of the M-Net Book Prize), interrogates the past and present of an anti-apartheid activist, as does Achmat Dangor’s Bitter Fruit (2001).Mike Nicol’s first novel, The Powers That Be (1989), brought a magic-realist sensibility to South African literature, and his latest, The Ibis Tapestry (1998) is a post-modern take on the secrets of South Africa’s apartheid abuses. Among Afrikaans writers now translated into English, notable works have come from Etienne van Heerden, particularly the marvellous Ancestral Voices (1989), and from Marlene Van Niekerk, with the hilarious and horrifying Triomf (1994).Phaswane Mpe’s Welcome to Our Hillbrow (2001) is a critically acclaimed view of the physical and moral decay in both the rural areas of Tiragalong and the urban ghetto of Hillbrow. Kgafela wa Magogodi is a poet who probes issues such as Aids in his collection Thy Condom Come (2000).Some quarters have observed that post-liberation writing has shifted from the representation of racial division to that of class difference, reflecting the new social fabric. In fact, writers have become interested in class relationships rather than race since the government’s black empowerment policy began to help black people join the circle of the white bourgeoisie, while the poor comprise both races even though blacks still dominate this group.Also, a common feature in post-apartheid literature is a concern with nation-building projects. Various authors have explored the possibility of re-assessing past identities in order to construct a new national identity based on a transcultural perspective.Back to topWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Buddhadeb out of CPI (M) Bengal State Committee

first_imgTwenty senior leaders — including former Chief Minister Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee — have been “released” from the West Bengal State Committee of the Communist Party of India-Marxist (CPI-M) on Thursday. As many as 17 new members are inducted into the 80-member Committee. The youngest member of the State Committee is Madhuja Sen Roy (33) while the seniormost is Biman Basu (77), a Politburo member. The seniormost leaders, including Mr. Bhattacharjee, have been accommodated as special invitees, party’s State Secretary Surjya Kanta Mishra said after the 4-day-long triennial State conference.Mr. Bhattacharjee participated in a couple of sessions of the State conference and was repeatedly requested by party’s senior leadership to stay in the State Committee. “But once he takes a decision, it is very difficult to make him change his mind. He wanted the State Committee to release him. We resisted but, finally, we had to release him owing to health-related issues,” he said. Besides Mr. Bhattacharjee, the senior leaders who are now out of the State Committee but accommodated as special invitees are: Shyamal Chakraborty, Madan Ghosh, Dipak Sarkar, Basudeb Acharya, Kanti Ganguly, Asim Dasgupta and Nirupam Sen. New team The upper age limit of the State Committee members is fixed at 75 years. “Only in the case of Biman Basu, the rule has been relaxed by the Committee as he is more youthful than the younger leaders,” Mr. Mishra said. He said the party at the State level has followed its policy to develop a team of “youth, middle-aged and senior members”.last_img read more

Would not prefer IPL being shifted from India: Kumble

first_imgThiruvananthapuram, Apr 27 (PTI) Former Indian skipper Anil Kumble today said that he was not in favour of shifting the Indian Premier League (IPL) matches from the country. “IPL is a global brand which brings in lot of revenue to the country. It should not be shifted,” he told reporters during a visit to the Greenfield Stadium at Karyavattom here. The veteran cricketer was here to visit the Sports Hub Trivandrum at the stadium and spend time with the first batch of students of a sports coaching academy, co-supported by Kumbles sports training and consulting company TENVIC. Last week, BCCI secretary Anurag Thakur had hinted that IPLs Governing Council may deliberate moving the 2017 edition abroad. IPL was twice played outside India, both in assembly election years. In 2009, it was moved for the entire duration to South Africa and in 2014 was shifted to the United Arab Emirates for the first 15 days. This edition has seen many PILs filed by by various outfits. 12 matches have been moved out of drought-hit Maharashtra on Bombay High Courts directive after a PIL was filed claiming that a huge quantity of water was being used to maintain various cricket stadiums in the state. Earlier during an interaction with students, Kumble said that his academy was looking forward to bring top class coaching to the states budding sports stars. The KSFL-TENVIC sports coaching academy commenced operations here on April 20 with coaching for cricket and football. TENVIC, founded by Kumble and table tennis player Vasanth Bharadwaj, entered Kerala in association with the Sports Hub Trivandrum. PTI LGK UD APR KHS ATadvertisementlast_img read more

Gopi, Rawat among top Indian runners in Mumbai Marathon

first_imgMumbai, Jan 11 (PTI) Recently crowned Asian champion Gopi Thonakal and fellow Army long distance runner Nitendra Singh Rawat, the course record holder among Indians, are the star attractions among the home countrys male runners in the Tata Mumbai Marathon to be held on January 21.Gopi, from Army Sports Institute of Pune, will go into the gruelling run on Mumbais streets in the 15th edition of the marathon with his confidence high after becoming the first-ever male runner from the country to clinch the Asian marathon title in Dongguan in China on November 26, clocking 2 hours, 15 minutes and 48 seconds.Rawat, from the Kumaon Regiment, is expected to give him a run for his money after his feat as the best Indian finisher in the Delhi half marathon, and his performance as the top Indian finisher here in 2016.Both had also taken part in the 2016 Rio Olympic Games with Gopi ending up a creditable 25th in 2 hours, 15 minutes and 25 seconds while a hamstring injury affected Rawats performance as he finished a distant 84th.The 29-year-old Gopi from Wayanad in Kerala had finished 28th in the World Championship last year in London, clocking 2:17:13.Their head-to-head rivalry, similar to what was experienced in 2016 when Rawat was the top Indian finisher in 2:25:48 just ahead of Gopi, is expected to be among the highlights of the USD 405,000 event to be title-sponsored by the Tata Group for the first time.”We are happy to be the title sponsors of the Mumbai Marathon as its the first big event for us in 2018 which marks 150 years of the Tata Group,” said Harish Bhat, Brand Custodian of the Groups flagship, Tata Sons, at a media conference here today.advertisementGuangzhou Asian Games (2010) steeplechase gold medal winner Sudha Singh is the top draw among the Indian women. She will have to contend with the challenge from L Suriya, the fastest Indian woman and course record holder of the Airtel Delhi half marathon and Tata Steel Kolkata 25K events, among others.South Africas Olympian Hendrick Ramaala, the 2004 mens winner, has been roped in as the pacemaker of the Indian contingent.The elite list of foreign runners has already been announced by event promoters, Procam International.The mens elite field has 2017 Tokyo Marathon runner-up Solomon Deksisa of Ethiopia and last years Mumbai Marathon runner-up Joshua Kipkorir, among others.The corresponding womens field will see last years winner Bornes Kitur of Kenya defending her title.The start and finish route of the race is expected to see a small change because of the under-construction work for the Mumbai Metro on the D N Road stretch from Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus and Hutatma Chowk (Flora Fountain), informed Joint MD of Procam, Vivek Singh.”We are working with the government authorities on how best to tweak the route at the start and finish of the race,” said Singh to a question. PTI SSR KRKlast_img read more

Will Mithali Raj retire from T20Is after World T20 fiasco in West Indies?

first_imgMithali Raj has the swagger that could have earned her million dollar contracts if she were playing men’s cricket in India. She nonchalantly reads books before going out to bat in World Cup matches, shuts down journalists who come up with borderline sexist questions.On top of all this, Raj scores runs, plenty of them. The 35-year-old cricketer from Rajasthan is the leading run-scorer in women’s ODIs. With 6550 runs at an average of 51.17, Raj is well ahead of the chasing pack that has several big names from women’s cricket.Raj has served Indian cricket for 20 years and for the most part, shouldered the burden of the team single-handedly. She didn’t always have the luxury to hold her pose after a cracking drive, considering broadcast deals were an unknown entity in women’s cricket until very recently. But she kept scoring, winning matches for the team like no else before her had done.And that’s why when she was dropped from the Indian playing XI for the World T20 semi-final against England in the Caribbean last week, there was a huge furore back in the country. Fans lashed out at the team selection that arguably cost India a place in the final. Experts pitched in and Raj’s manager blasted captain Harmanpreet Kaur on Twitter before deleting her post.Also read: Ganguly relates to Mithali’s omission from World T20 semi-final: ‘Welcome to the group’ Raj had scored a couple of match-winning fifties in the group stages wherein India looked unstoppable. However, she was forced to sit out of their final round-robin match against Australia with a knee injury.advertisementRaj was declared fit on the eve of the semi-final but India insisted on going in with a winning combination that saw their most experienced player warm the benches. When India collapsed from 89 for 2 to 112 all-out, Raj’s straight face that was captured by the television cameras told the entire story.Also read: Mithali Raj ‘terribly disappointed’ after World T20 semis axing, says personal coachRaj’s strike-rate, which has been around run-a-ball in the shortest format of the game, had been a cause of concern for quite some time now. At a time when India are looking ahead, especially after the arrival of coach Ramesh Powar, the senior campaigner was no longer a certain starter in T20Is.Raj has scored 575 runs from 22 innings in 2018 at an average of 35.93 but her performances in the lead-up to the tournament were far from impressive. Eventually, the right-hander didn’t get to bat in the tournament opener wherein India amassed 194 runs.However, in low-scoring matches, especially against arch-rivals Pakistan, Raj’s experience augured well for Harmanpreet’s side. Notably, Raj opened the innings for the team and hit a match-winning 47-ball 56.As it turns out, Raj had a difficult time throughout the tournament as there was quite a lot of uncertainty surrounding her place in the side, according to Mid-Day. The batting snub in the opening match didn’t help either as she didn’t have a fixed batting position in the recent past.Raj was reportedly told about her omission from the playing XI for the semi-final only after the pre-match warm-up – a gesture that had left her “terribly disappointed”, according to her personal coach RSR Murthy.Even if Raj’s axing is being projected as a tactical move by the management, the message has been sent out loud and clear. The veteran’s time as part of the Indian setup in the shortest format is up and if reports are to be believed, Raj has come to terms with it.The “harsh treatment” meted to Raj at the World T20 has pushed her into contemplating retirement from the shortest format of the game, according to the news daily.Notably, Raj wasn’t thinking about quitting the T20I formats and had wanted to continue playing even after the global spectacle in the Caribbean but the latest turn of events seems to have influenced her decision. Nonetheless, Raj had conceded during the tournament that she wouldn’t be playing another World T20 for the country.The seasoned campaigner, who is still the captain of the women’s ODI team, is seemingly hopeful of playing the 2021 World Cup. Raj may want to focus solely on building a team for the global 50-over spectacle and she has ample time to do so.Far from ideal circumstances for Team IndiaMeanwhile, It remains to be seen if the reported rift between two of the superstar cricketers of the women’s team – Raj and Harmanpreet – will have an impact on team in the near future.advertisementHarmanpreet is undoubtedly one of the most popular women’s cricketers in the world, let alone in the country. Her unbeaten 171 against Australia in the Women’s World Cup semi-final last year is arguably among the best World Cup knocks ever played.However, Harmanpreet has had a tough time in one-day cricket since her magnificent hundred over a year ago. Since her second ODI hundred in 2013, the 29-year-old has scored only one century and has been under-par in the ongoing season wherein she has managed just 195 runs 12 matches at 21.66.What if and there’s a big IF – Harmanpreet has to be dropped because of her lack of runs in the one-day format? Will that be seen as an act of revenge by Mithali the ODI skipper, no matter how tactical the reason is? These are not ideal circumstances for a team and far from ideal.Mithali’s experience could have been vital against England in the semi-final. Her manager (she later said she did not manage Mithali) muddied the waters further with her explosive comments against Harmanpreet. Who knows what the mood will be in the Indian team like? Maybe the women will put this behind them and focus on the challenges that lay ahead.And if Mithalai decides to hang up her boots in T20s, it will be a setback that the Indian team will not be immediately able to deal with.Also see:last_img read more

Abhinandan Varthaman’s Gunslinger: Tamil moustache all of India wants

first_imgOnce you see him it is difficult to forget him. The face, characterised with a thick gunslinger moustache with thin mutton chop beard and a proud smile, is hard to miss. The image of his face and his moustache lingers on in your mind’s eye after the first glance. We are talking about none other than Indian Air Force (IAF) braveheart Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman, who returned to India after being held captive by Pakistan on February 27.In the wake of the hardship he went through, when you visualise Abhinandan Varthaman’s smiling face, his hard-to-miss gunslinger moustache appears to radiate pride and confidence.His grit and determination further exemplified in his mannerism when he was held by the Pakistan Army.How proud we are to have you ! Bow down to your skills and even more your grit and courage #WelcomeBackAbhinandan . We love you and are filled with pride because of you.#WeAreSupposedToTellYouThis pic.twitter.com/IfqBFNNa3TVirender Sehwag (@virendersehwag) March 1, 2019Unlike characters from the England of the 18-19th century, Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman doesn’t sport a messy moustache.In fact, as you see his photos and videos closely, you will observe that his moustache is beautifully crafted in a manner that ensures that neither his radiating smile, nor his proud face gets covered with it.Wanna grow a moustache like IAF Pilot Abhinandan Varthaman!!!(@debarshi_taki) March 1, 2019Abhinandan Varthaman’s moustache does not fit into any airtight characterisation of moustaches. It heavily resembles the gunslinger, but also has some characteristics of the horseshoe, the Hungarian, and the wild west moustache. For a complete look, Abhinandan Varthaman sports his gunslinger moustache with a thin strap mutton chop beard.advertisementA slightly longer version of his moustache was sported by General Alexander Shaler, a highly decorated officer from the United States of America. A simple search on Wikipedia suggests that he received the US military’s highest decoration, the Medal of Honour. This was for his role in the Second battle of Fredericksburg.Can we speak for a moment about how amazing Wg Cdr Abhinandan Varthaman’s Moustache is? https://t.co/p5BolOfVI8Ken Dennis (@KenDennis) February 28, 2019Ever since the news of Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman being taken captive by Pakistan broke and videos of him being questioned started doing the rounds, praise for his bravery, courage and grit has flooded the social media.People have not only hailed his courage and ability to maintain calm despite being taken captive by Pakistan, there are many who want to sport a moustache like him. His fans have started expressing their desire on Twitter and Instagram.Don’t be surprised if it becomes the next style sensation in India as it welcomes its hero with the chant: Abhibanadan ka abhinandan ho!ALSO READ | #WelcomeBackAbhinandan: Indian sports stars cheer as air warrior returns homeALSO READ | Abhinandan Varthaman carries a legacy of courage, grace, valourALSO READ | ABHINANDAN, Varthaman: Kashmiri youth welcome IAF hero, back peace processALSO READ | IAF pilot Abhinandan’s father thanks people for being with family in hour of needlast_img read more